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Updated: 54 min 55 sec ago

Trentin thrills with Giro stage 18 win

1 hour 14 min ago

Matteo Trentin made his way into the day's big breakaway and came away with a win in the Giro's stage 18 after chasing down the two leaders in the closing kilometer. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The Giro d’Italia afforded more surprises Thursday as a steep, final cobbled climb seemingly set up a two-man sprint, but Matteo Trentin charged from behind to snatch a suprise victory in Pinerolo, Italy.

His Etixx – Quick-Step teammate Gianluca Brambilla sat patiently on Moreno Moser’s wheel in the final kilometer of stage 18. The Cannondale rider wasn’t ready for Trentin to blaze past in the final 200 meters to claim his first career Giro stage win. He settled for second while Brambilla finished third.

The top GC riders finished well behind, but there was no change in the overall standings.

Full report and results to follow.

The post Trentin thrills with Giro stage 18 win appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Nibali facing one of the hardest challenges of his career

1 hour 45 min ago

Vincenzo Nibali has struggled in the Giro, but his team is still hoping he can ride into Torino and win the pink jersey. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

PINEROLO, Italy (VN) — Fans cheer Vincenzo Nibali as if he is leading the Giro d’Italia, but their Italian champion is living through what team Astana calls the “hardest point in his career.”

If it were baseball, the 31-year-old Sicilian would already be in the dugout. Not once, but three times Nibali struck out in this Giro d’Italia. It seemed small at first, losing 43 seconds to pink jersey holder Steven Kruijswijk of LottoNL – Jumbo Saturday, but then it turned worse. Nibali slipped 2:10 behind in what insiders call the race of truth, a time trial up Alpe di Siusi. Seeming not fully understanding his own abilities, Nibali attacked Tuesday to draw out the favorites but was unable to sustain the effort, falling behind and losing 1:47 by the finish in Andalo.

Nibali began the race as the heavy favorite to win the overall, but entering Thursday’s stage 18 he was fourth overall and trailed Kruijswijk by 4:43.

Astana called in its medical team from Torino to poke and prod Nibali before Thursday’s start in Milan’s outskirts. The doctors will reveal their findings to the team later Thursday, but followers sense trouble.

“His morale is not at its best but in life this happens,” team manager Giuseppe Martinelli said at Astana’s bus Thursday morning after Nibali stepped off to a hero’s welcome. Martinelli also guided Marco Pantani, Gilberto Simoni, and Damiani Cunego to grand tour wins and through difficult times.

“This happens to the big champions, and it’s happening to him. Maybe it is the hardest point of his career, but we have to look ahead.”

Not all is lost. In fact, the Astana camp appears in good spirits despite Nibali struggling to find his stride. He has already won all three grand tours. After his first, the 2010 Vuelta a España, he dominated the Giro d’Italia in 2013 and turned to the Tour de France to win in 2014.

In his Tour return last year, he struggled. Astana’s general manager Alexander Vinokourov criticized him and said he needed a mechanic to check his head. Nibali rebounded to win the La Toussuire stage and place fourth overall in the race.

“We need to see from the doctors what he has, I don’t know. Afterwards, we’ll decide what to do,” Martinelli added. “We need to get through today and start to think about the last two stages in the mountains.”

The Giro raced through the Po Valley to Pinerolo, west of Torino, on Thursday. Friday and Saturday, it heads through the surrounding Alps. The high passes will likely give more insight than the doctors are able to provide.

Nibali, off to the side Thursday morning, said, “my condition is what it is. I’m not going to make excuses for myself.”

Martinelli refuses to change plans to aim for second place, third place, or even a stage win. Instead, he still considers Nibali’s condition good enough to turn the Giro on its head.

“I have faith in him,” Martinelli said. “He’s a champion and a champion is always able to pull out something even when’s he’s at the bottom. Anything can happen.”

The post Nibali facing one of the hardest challenges of his career appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Ekimov: Zakarin has courage and character

1 hour 47 min ago

Viatcheslav Ekimov says the Katusha team is modernizing, and he feels Ilnur Zakarin will be the team's go-to GC rider in the coming years. Photo: Andrew Hood | VeloNews.com

Katusha has seen the future, and its name is Ilnur Zakarin. The tall, stringy 26-year-old is just what the Russian franchise has been waiting for.

Despite a hiccup midway through the Giro d’Italia, with a crash in the Chianti time trial that stalled his GC aspirations, Katusha is very pleased with how its budding star from Tatarstan is riding into the Giro’s final decisive weekend.

“This Giro is the first time he is playing the captaincy role on the team, and we want to see if he can hold this kind of pressure,” said Katusha general manager Viatcheslav Ekimov. “This is his big exam, and so far, we are happy.”

Katusha is a team without a franchise player, or at least, not one of its own. Spaniard Joaquim Rodríguez and Norwegian Alexander Kristoff have carried team colors the past several years, but Katusha is a Russian team, backed by Russian money, and up until now, a team that never had a Russian star to fly the flag.

That could change with Zakarin, who won the Tour de Romandie in 2015 as well as a stage in his Giro debut last year. With the podium still within reach going into the final weekend of the Giro, Ekimov sees leadership potential in Zakarin. Now fifth overall, he is just seven seconds behind Vincenzo Nibali (Astana) and 1:50 behind second-place Esteban Chaves (Orica – GreenEdge).

“He has his own character, and he has qualities to be a team captain,” Ekimov said. “He is a guy you can talk with, and he will listen to you, but he also has his own mind and vision. I like this, because he is not like a puppet.”

Evidence of that strength of character and ambition was revealed during the Chianti time trial in stage 9. A strong ride would have put him into the pink jersey, but he took too many risks on wet roads, and crashed heavily. He was left bleeding for 20 minutes from a deep gash while waiting for doping control before a doctor was allowed to attend him. Zakarin didn’t complain, and he’s clawed his way back into contention, now fifth at 4:50 back.

“I don’t want to say to be conservative, but he needs to be smart. He was being too risky, and that’s what caused his crash. That was not necessary,” Ekimov said. “It’s also good, because that shows his courage and his character, but that was a good lesson to be more realistic for the future.”

Zakarin is an interesting character. La Gazzetta dello Sport revealed this week he is a non-practicing Muslim, and lives and trains on Cyprus. With solid time trialing skills and improving climbing chops, Zakarin could develop into a Tour de France contender.

“It’s important that he continues on this line,” Ekimov said. “This Giro is important test to see his capacity.”

New look, new structure for Katusha

Zakarin’s rise comes as Katusha is making some interesting changes behind the scenes. Russian magnate Igor Makarov is still backing the squad, but Ekimov confirmed the team is also looking for international sponsors to step up. The team has also undergone an dramatic facelift, with a distinctive new color scheme and kit design.

“The future of team is very bright. We have switched to international professional team with commercial interest, so we are open to international sponsors. We are very busy on this,” he said. “We are working with a professional marketing team and designer, and they helped us with our new look.”

Ekimov said the team is also developing its own clothing line, team-sponsored cycling events, as well as a Katusha Café, what he described as a “pit stop where cyclists can stop, have a coffee, and talk about the sport.”

Team Katusha was born in 2009 as part of the Russian Global Cycling Project, with an aim of developing new stars in a post-Soviet world. Ekimov was part of a generation of riders in the early 1990s that came out of the former Soviet Union to break into the European peloton. Others included Pavel Tonkov, Evgeni Berzin, and Dmitri Konyshev (who now works as a sport director at Katusha).

New wave of Russian riders

Zakarin marks a third wave of riders who grew up after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Other promising Russians include Matvey Mamykin, 21, third in the 2015 Tour de l’Avenir, and Alexander Foliforov, 24, winner of the climbing time trial at Alpe di Susi.

“There was a gap, but now we are seeing a new generation of Russian riders coming up,” Ekimov said. “It’s a different generation, and they are connected to technologies today, iPhone, Twitter, and Facebook. They are open to world. It’s not like when we were growing up [in the Soviet Union]. We were open, too, but we were limited, and we spent all of our time on the bike.”

Any advice from a man who used to train 40,000km a year when he was a professional cyclist?

“The most important thing is that they want to join this life of being a professional cyclist, if they want to make money doing this, they have to be 100 percent, and dedicate everything to cycling,” he said. “That has never changed.”

The post Ekimov: Zakarin has courage and character appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Sagan to Astana? Oh no!

2 hours 26 min ago

Will Peter Sagan be wearing Astana blue in 2017? There are a few good reasons why he shouldn't. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

If your response to yesterday’s news that Peter Sagan may join Astana was to immediately slam your laptop shut and pretend you didn’t actually read that, you’re not alone.

Sagan and Astana sit at opposite ends of cycling’s “fun” spectrum, and paring them would be like making Justin Timberlake work for Enron. Don’t believe me? Observe:

Sagan is best known for 1.) being the most exciting cyclist of this generation due to his ability to win bunch sprints, cobbled classics, and hilly one-day races, and 2.) for his mainstream appeal due to his penchant for wheelies, jaw-dropping YouTube videos, and yes, his flowing man mane (sometimes a man bun).

Astana, by contrast, is known for, um, 1.) Alexander Vinokourov’s curious public persona, 2.) the team’s repeated doping investigations, and 3.) Borat.

Sure, I realize there are practical reasons behind the potential marriage. Astana needs to boost its results in order to keep that oil money flowing into its account. Fabio Aru’s Vuelta win gave the team enormous bragging rights. But Astana’s 2016 campaign has been incredibly forgettable, with only 18 wins so far. Vincenzo Nibali’s Giro effort is a disaster, and his last great ride involved the team car.

But Astana is one of the only teams with the coffers to pay Sagan, who after his classics dominance this year is bound to demand a hefty salary. According to the report in Gazetta dello Sport, Sagan could earn as much as 4 million Euros in the deal.

As a cycling fan, I don’t besmirch Sagan for taking the cash. But I don’t see a Sagan-Astana marriage being particularly fun.

There are cycling reasons behind this assessment, too. This year Sagan finally blossomed into the cobbled classics superstar we always knew was hiding in his sprinters legs. He won Flanders and Gent-Wevelgem with limited support from his Tinkoff teammates. They weren’t horrible, of course. Oscar Gatto made some of the final selections at Flanders. But it wasn’t as though Sagan had multiple teammates to call on for support, à la Fabian Cancellara and Tom Boonen.

Would a jump to Astana bring Sagan any better support? Assuming Lars Boom does not leave to race cyclocross, he could obviously assist Sagan on the cobblestones. The team also has Alexey Lutsenko, but that’s hardly a powerhouse squad. I do not believe Astana would offer any greater support than Tinkoff.

But back to the other, more pressing problems with Sagan with Astana.

As we all know, Sagan is a sports marketer’s dream. He’s well-spoken, friendly, and quick with a joke. He quotes “The Wolf of Wall Street” and livens up even those boring post-race interviews. He can hop into a top-level mountain bike race and hold his own. And yeah, he catches the eyes of female fans. He has all of the qualities to become cycling’s crossover star. You know, the guy who gains mainstream love for our wacky, niche sport.

In a perfect world, Sagan would land on a team with an aggressive public relations and marketing staff, who would hold repeated brainstorming sessions on how to get him into yogurt commercials or onto late night TV shows. “He needs to bunny hop onto Conan O’Brien’s desk? Yep, he can do that! He needs to nose-wheelie while sipping a Go-gurt? Sure! No problem!”

Astana, by contrast, is a black box of communication silence. You can credit that the team’s multiple doping suspensions and the constant threat to have its WorldTour license revoked. I can’t say whether or not the team employs an army of branding and PR specialists. My speculation, however, is that the team wouldn’t promote their star to the level he deserves. And if they did, would the interviews simply turn into a grill session about Astana’s latest polemic? “You vant to talk to Mr. Peter? NYET!”

In my perfect scenario, Sagan arrives to sign his new contract with Astana. At the last second, Vinokourov arrives. He’s wearing this amazing jersey, and tells Sagan that part of the deal requires him to race in the insane kit.

Sagan hops on his bicycle and wheelies out the door.

The post Sagan to Astana? Oh no! appeared first on VeloNews.com.

VeloNews magazine — June 2016

2 hours 49 min ago

In the June issue of VeloNews, we evaluate teams and riders at the season's midway point.

Where did the season go? Nowhere, actually. We’ve still got plenty to left — all sorts of reasons to keep checking VeloNews several times a day for race reports and other news. But enough of the season has passed us by for us to take stock and figure out who has shined, who has disappointed, and who seems poised to rip through the grand tours.

In addition to our mid-season analysis, the June issue of VeloNews features stories like:

The Rebirth of Team Cannondale

After struggling for the past few seasons, while team boss Jonathan Vaughters spent more and more time embroiled in cycling’s political fights, Cannondale Pro Cycling Team and Vaughters have returned to the quirky roots that made them such fan favorites when they entered the peloton. Even better, they’re winning again.

Fighting Back Against Amateur Doping

There’s no ignoring it. With studies showing that at least 10 percent of Cat. 1, 2, and 3 racers in the U.S. have doped, USA Cycling and USADA have stepped up efforts across the country — not just at races but also the much more effective out-of-competition testing. Yep. If you race in the U.S., you just might get a knock at your door.

Criterium Bikes

Crits are the most popular form of road racing in the U.S. And stiff aluminum crit bikes can be had without breaking the bank. Here’s the gear you need to attack your next office park series.

Illiac Artery Endofibrosis

Don’t worry about pronouncing it. Just know that it’s out there. The condition, which affects blood flow to the legs, is sending more and more pro riders into either surgery or retirement. We’re still in the early days of understanding the condition, but it’s clear that pros aren’t the only ones susceptible. Here’s what you need to know.

The French are Back

For too long, we’ve been writing off wins by French riders as anomalies or, at best, down to luck rather than talent. It’s time for that to stop. Among all cycling nations, France boasts a massive wealth of young talent for both the classics and the grand tours. It’s too early to say French riders are about to dominate the way they used to. But it’s definitely time to stop writing them off.

Just what does USA Cycling do?

Good question. So we asked new USA Cycling CEO Derek Bouchard-Hall. He answered by writing our lead essay this month.

Plus: All the regular departments and columns from VeloNews’s team of tech experts, pro riders, and goofballs.

The post VeloNews magazine — June 2016 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

U.S. Pro preview: Phinney returns

3 hours 24 min ago

Taylor Phinney will ride in search of two jerseys this weekend, in the time trial and road race. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

The stars and stripes of cycling’s U.S. national champions will be on the line this weekend as the domestic peloton descends on Winston-Salem, North Carolina for the 2016 Volkswagen USA Cycling Professional Road and Time Trial National Championships.

The event makes its return to the Carolinas following a three-year stint in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Defending road champions Megan Guarnier of Boels – Dolmans and Matthew Busche of United Healthcare will both be on hand to defend their titles, as will reigning women’s time trial champion Kristin Armstrong of Twenty16 – Ridebiker. Cannondale’s Andrew Talansky, winner of the 2015 men’s TT title, is not scheduled to participate.

Racing begins with Friday’s national time trial championships, when a pair of former winners — Armstrong and BMC Racing’s Taylor Phinney — will enter the start house as odds-on favorites. For Phinney, a return to nationals holds special significance. The 25-year-old Boulder, Colorado native came to Chattanooga in 2014 so confident in his ability to win a second U.S. time trial title that his team had already designed and manufactured a patriotic skin suit for him to wear at the Critérium du Dauphiné the following month. While Phinney took the 2014 title handily, besting second-place finisher Tom Zirbel by nearly a minute over the 19.2-mile course, his star spangled skinsuit would never be worn in competition. Two days later during the road race, he crashed on the descent of Lookout Mountain and suffered a break to his left leg that nearly ended his career.

“It’s obviously present in my mind,” Phinney said of his return to the race that kept him off the bike for a year. “It’s a little weird, but truly, I think my whole outlook on that incident is much more positive than people would assume.”

Phinney describes his convalescence as an unexpected opportunity to grow as a person, rather than simply an athlete.

“It gave me the opportunity to step outside of not only the tiny bubble that is cycling, but also the slightly larger bubble of the sporting world itself,” he said. “I am forever grateful for the opportunity to go through that and come out with a completely different outlook on what I’m doing. It’s made me so much stronger mentally. I’ve been doing a lot of yoga and meditating. It’s opened up a whole new side of my psyche.”

This new — and more grounded — Phinney hasn’t given the first thought to the design of his next champion’s skinsuit, much less produced one in advance. Instead, he will approach Friday’s 29.8-mile (48km) time trial as a stepping stone to his season’s primary goal: landing a spot on Team USA for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. In this regard, he isn’t alone.

For Armstrong, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, Friday’s time trial could also be the decisive punch on her ticket to Rio. With three women’s slots scheduled for selection on June 24, the 42-year-old Boise, Idaho native hopes that a fifth national championship will seal her place on Team USA.

The 20.5-mile (33km) women’s TT course is one that should suit the defending champion well, with a series of sharp rollers that make the course profile look not unlike an EKG reading of one’s heartbeat.

“It’s a really great time trial course,” Armstrong said after a test ride on Wednesday. There are really no flat sections. It’s just roller after roller. And they’re sharp. Every one is 3-6 percent. It’s not an especially technical course. The roads are super smooth, so there isn’t really any fear of potholes or cracks, but the challenge will be those rollers. They call the time trial the race of truth, and I think they’ve really nailed it with this Winston-Salem course.”

One person not sweating whether she will be headed to Rio is reigning women’s road champion Megan Guarnier. With her third-place finish in the road race at the UCI Road World Championships in Richmond last October, Guarnier is the only American woman whose spot on Team USA is secure.

For Guarnier, who won her first national road title in 2012, the past few years have been a whirlwind of escalating success. After spending a year as the only American on the Rabo – Liv women’s team in 2013, where she rode in support of world champion Marianne Vos, the 31-year-old Glens Falls, New York native signed with the Dutch Boels squad in 2014. She has shared leadership duties on that squad with a who’s who of the biggest names in the women’s peloton, including current world champion Lizzie Armitstead, Chantal Black, and fellow American Evelyn Stevens (who will also compete on the roads of North Carolina this weekend).

Fresh off the biggest stage race win of her career at the Amgen Tour of California, Guarnier will arrive in Winston-Salem as both the defending national champion and the current leader of the UCI Women’s WorldTour. For Guarnier, the chance to fly the colors of her nation on the sport’s biggest stage is a dream come true — and it’s not one she’s eager to turn over.

“Yeah, I really, really want to win and defend this jersey,” Guarnier said of Saturday’s 87-mile (140km) women’s road race. “It’s always really nice to wear the stars and stripes over in Europe … and to be able to be on the podium in that jersey? I just feel like I’m representing the United States in a special way.”

Trek – Segafredo’s Kiel Reijnen has long had his heart set on representing his country in the same way. The 29-year-old Bainbridge Island, Washington native has placed third in the national road race on four prior occasions, including a near-miraculous comeback on the streets of downtown Chattanooga in 2015 after a mechanical on the final downtown circuit threatened to place him far out of contention. Despite a heroic effort that put him almost inexplicably on the podium in third place, the loss was crushing to the former UnitedHealthcare rider.

“That day it was really hard to swallow,” Reijnen recalled of the day. “I mean really, really hard to swallow. But a little later I was able to look back on it feeling really proud of what I did that day. It was definitely one of those in the moment kind of things where it didn’t really sink in until later how it had all gone down.”

Asked if this most recent close encounter with the stars and stripes left him determined to take them home on Saturday, Reijnen was unequivocal.

“Absolutely. I’ve been close so many times now, even on days where my legs didn’t feel that great,” he said. “There’s something about fighting it out for that jersey in front of a ‘hometown’ [American] crowd, that gives you a little something extra. To wear that jersey would be amazing.”

VeloNews’ Dan Wuori will be on location in Winston-Salem all weekend. For live updates from the Volkswagen USA Cycling Professional Road and Time Trial National Championships, follow Dan on Twitter at @dwuori.

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Nizzolo: ‘Karma is against me’

May 25, 2016 - 3:58pm

Giacomo Nizzolo has come so close to winning a Giro stage, but still hasn't made it to the top step of the podium. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

CASSANO d’Adda, Italy (VN) — Giacomo Nizzolo didn’t know whether to laugh or cry. It was perhaps a little of both for Trek – Segafredo’s sprinter after yet another bittersweet second place in Wednesday’s sprint finale.

Despite 13 career Giro d’Italia top-threes, including nine times runner-up, Nizzolo has never won a stage in his national grand tour. All he could do Wednesday was shake his head in disbelief.

“We can’t do more than what we are doing,” Nizzolo said. “Karma is against me.”

With such rivals as Marcel Kittel (Etixx – Quick-Step), Caleb Ewan (Orica – GreenEdge) and André Greipel (Lotto – Soudal) abandoning the race, Nizzolo looked to be next in line to finally win a long-sought-after Giro stage, but it wasn’t meant to be. IAM’s Roger Kluge attacked the peloton in the final kilometer, and after working hard to chase down a six-man breakaway, the weary peloton couldn’t control Kluge, who won just ahead of Nizzolo, who led the peloton.

“What more can I do than this? I just won the sprint, and every time I am there,” Nizzolo said. “I don’t know what I have done wrong to have this, but for sure there are worse things in life. We just need to keep going.”

Nizzolo, 27, has been knocking on the door of a Giro stage victory the past few seasons. A pro since 2011, he’s won 12 races, with one at the WorldTour level. Highly consistent, but perhaps just missing that top-end speed to compete against the Kittels and Greipels of the peloton, Nizzolo has patiently been knocking on the door for a Giro win since his first corsa rosa in 2012.

Last year, he won the Giro’s points jersey competition for the first time, and looks to have a lock on a second if he makes it to Torino on Sunday. More than that, he desperately wants to win a stage in his national grand tour.

With Thursday’s long stage capped by two passages over a short climb undermining a likely bunch sprint, followed by two climbing stages in the Alps, the Italian knows that he will have to wait until Sunday to have one more shot at securing an elusive stage win.

“We took our responsibility in the race, in the end, of course, we missed some power, but that is normal. If we did not pull before, probably the six guys in the breakaway make it,” Nizzolo said. “So we have no regrets. I have no regrets. That’s it. We have to accept another second place, but we keep our heads high.”

The post Nizzolo: ‘Karma is against me’ appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Orica expects Yates verdict in coming weeks

May 25, 2016 - 1:24pm

Simon Yates' Orica – GreenEdge team said his positive test for terbutaline was an administrative error. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

CASSANO D’ADDA – Orica – GreenEdge owner Gerry Ryan is optimistic for quick action from the UCI so Simon Yates can return to racing, possibly at the Tour de France.

Yates, 23, has not raced since early April after an adverse analytical finding for the banned substance Terbutaline from stage 6 in Paris-Nice. Ryan is hopeful the UCI will deliver its ruling within two weeks.

“Everything has been sent in. We will just wait and see the outcome,” Ryan said Wednesday. “Hopefully they will look upon [it] as a genuine mistake.”

Ryan, who is following the Giro d’Italia, where Orica – GreenEdge’s Colombian rider Esteban Chaves is placed second overall, also reaffirmed his hope that the UCI would regard the case as a “genuine mistake,” considering the team took full responsibility for it.

At the very least, Ryan is confident the UCI’s verdict will be handed with enough time before the Tour in July 2 to allow the team to prepare for the race — likewise for Yates, should the outcome mean that he is eligible to race in it. “I think the UCI realize Simon is a contender to ride the Tour,” Ryan said. “Hopefully they see the rationale and, in the next week or so, we’ll get an outcome.”

Yates’s adverse analytical finding came after stage 6 of Paris-Nice on March 12. The team was notified on April 22, but it was then leaked and reported by The Daily Mail on April 28. Though he hasn’t been provisionally suspended, Yates hasn’t raced since then.

Terbutaline is used for asthma, but banned in competition unless riders have a therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for its use. Orica – GreenEdge accepted full responsibility for what it described as an oversight, saying in a statement that Yates was not at fault and that the substance was given to him to treat “documented asthma problems” in the form of an inhaler — a fact the team said was noted by the team doctor in the doping control form. But the team said the doctor made an “administrative error” by failing to apply for the TUE.

The promising Brit last raced in stage 5 of the Vuelta al Pais Vasco on April 8, but has trained while awaiting the UCI verdict. Asked if the uncertainty is a weight for Yates to carry, Ryan said, “It is, but he is upbeat and looking forward, thinking positively and focusing on the Tour.”

The post Orica expects Yates verdict in coming weeks appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Giro stage 17 photos: Sneak attack surprises sprinters

May 25, 2016 - 12:34pm

The breakaway was caught in the final kilometers but other riders jumped off the front during the catch. Filippo Pozzato had a good gap with 500 meters to go, but Roger Kluge was coming on strong. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

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  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Molveno sign-in

    Riders lined up for sign-in in the start town of Molveno. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Kilometer zero

    The neutral roll-out took the peloton around the shoreline of Lake Molveno. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Three-man break

    Once the race got underway, a three-man break formed, including Daniel Oss, Pavel Brutt, and Eugert Zhupa. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Oss climbs

    Daniel Oss led the breakaway over the Passo Sant'Eusebio. Oss was also chasing intermediate sprint points along the way. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Six-man break

    After passing through an intermediate sprint, another three-man group rode ahead of the peloton and joined the breakaway. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: The sprint

    The breakaway was caught in the final kilometers but other riders jumped off the front during the catch. Filippo Pozzato had a good gap with 500 meters to go, but Roger Kluge was coming on strong. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Kluge checks the gap

    Kluge passed Pozzato and had time to check on his gap before crossing the line. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Kluge wins

    Kluge crossed the line to grab his first ever grand tour win. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Nizzolo dissapointment

    Giacomo Nizzolo came across in second place realizing that he had missed an opportunity for a stage win. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: IAM Cycling celebration

    Kluge was congratulated by his IAM teammates after the finish. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Kruijswijk in pink

    Steven Kruijswijk came in safely with the group and holds the lead in the Giro d'Italia ahead of the final stages of the race. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2016 Giro d'Italia, stage 17: Kluge podium

    It was a big win for Kluge and the IAM Cycling squad which had just announced that the team will be coming to a close at the end of the 2016 season. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

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Young Jungels looks a lot like Wiggins

May 25, 2016 - 11:37am

Bob Jungels is content to use his time trial prowess to ride high on GC at the Giro, but he's not concerned when out-paced by climbing specialists. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

CASSANO D’ADDA, Italy (VN) — Bob Jungels plans to stay the same powerful time trial rider and climber in the coming years, which he says could be enough for the grand tours.

Jungels led home the Giro d’Italia stars in the 40.5-kilometer Chianti time trial last Sunday and took over the pink jersey as race leader on the uphill finish to Sestola two days later. The mix of time trial and climbing speed suits the 23-year-old Luxembourger well.

“I think it’s impossible to change your body, it’s how you are,” Jungels said. “I have a lot of muscles, but that’s also my strength. If there was a flat time trial of 50 kilometers in the last week here, I’d be lucky. Now we have mountains, and I’m trying to defend myself.

“Like Bradley Wiggins? Yeah. It depends on the perspective you have. This Giro, with the three time trials, definitely helped me, but of course now in the mountains, I’m defending myself quiet well, and that’s how I want to continue in the future.”

Wiggins lost weight and improved his climbing with altitude camps before winning the 2012 Tour de France, which suited him perfectly with two long time trials totaling 100 kilometers.

Jungels still has years ahead of him to develop, but took a big step in the Giro. He let slip the pink jersey, but wears the white jersey of best young rider comfortably. He sits seventh overall in the general classification, 7:57 behind leader Steven Kruijswijk (LottoNL – Jumbo), and holds the white jersey by 14:17 over Sebastian Henao (Sky).

He weights around 155 pounds (70-71kg) so he must push harder to cover the passes, but can power through time trial stages. In February, he won the overall of the Etoile de Bessèges thanks to a time trial stage win on the final day of the French race.

In the final stages of the Giro, he faces some of the race’s hardest stages. Stage 19 covers the 21.3-kilometer climb up the Colle dell’Agnello to 2,744 meters (9,003 feet) before the final climb to Risoul on Friday. He will test himself to see what is possible for the coming years.

“The Giro’s been a surprise for me, as well. I kind of came here with a classification ambition, but I didn’t know how far I could go. Obviously, I’m really surprised, I’ve seen my strengths and weaknesses over the last weeks. It’s been a really good Giro for me because I’ve learnt many things,” Jungels explained.

“What happens next depends a little on the team’s ambition, but it’s going to be the same program more or less. Maybe it won’t be the Giro, maybe it’ll be the Vuelta a España or the Tour de France, but for the rest, I’m still competitive in the one-week stage races. I have to pick the targets with the team and figure out what’s best for me.”

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Kruijswijk won’t pull a ‘Dumoulin’ in Giro’s crucible

May 25, 2016 - 10:55am

LottoNL – Jumbo's sport director is confident that Kruijswijk won't crack like Dumoulin did in the Vuelta. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

CASSANO D’ADDA, Italy (VN) — The scenario at the end of the Giro d’Italia is eerily similar to last year’s Vuelta a España. With just a few key mountain stages remaining, there is a surprise Dutchman wearing the leader’s jersey, fighting off a pack of Italian and Spanish climbers, and hoping to pull off a highly unexpected and historic grand tour victory.

There is one major difference between Tom Dumoulin in last year’s Vuelta, and Steven Kruijswijk in this year’s Giro. Kruijswijk shows no signs of cracking.

“There are some similarities,” said LottoNL – Jumbo sport director Addy Engels. “They both held the leader’s jersey in the last week of a grand tour, and it’s also unexpected. Tactically, the big difference is that Steven is a stronger climber. Last year, Tom lost time on every major climb, and this Giro, Steven is the strongest climber in the peloton.”

Engels has a very interesting perspective. Last year, he was Dumoulin’s sport director at Giant – Alpecin before he switched to LottoNL – Jumbo over the winter. He had a front-row seat to Dumoulin’s implosion in the Vuelta’s last major mountain stage, eventually settling into sixth. Engels is confident the scene won’t repeat itself with Kruijswijk.

“Tom was always fighting to limit the losses on every climbing stage,” Engels said at the team bus Wednesday morning. “In this Giro, Steven is following the best riders, and he’s one of the strongest climbers in the race. That’s a big difference.”

Another key contrast between Dumoulin’s Vuelta and Kruijswijk’s Giro is their respective leads. Last year, Dumoulin rolled into the final stage with a slender, three-second gap, while Kruijswijk has three minutes on second-place Esteban Chaves (Orica – GreenEdge) with four stages left to go. That huge gap gives Kruijswijk a lot of room to play with.

“That is very important,” Engels continued. “Steven can ride defensively, and follow the best riders. We have to stay sharp, and watch our rivals.”

With a trio of strong performances in the key stages across the Dolomites, Kruijswijk is in the driver’s seat of this Giro. With only Thursday’s transition stage on tap before the final showdown in the Alps, his confidence is growing by the day. Despite having never led a major grand tour in his life, the 28-year-old is handling it with aplomb.

“He is handling it very well. He is staying cool,” Engels said. “There was some tension [Tuesday], because it was the day after a rest day, and no one knows how they will react, and we knew it would be an explosive stage. Otherwise, he is very calm. In the team meetings and in the race, he is handling it like he’s been wearing the pink jersey for the 10th time. For the first time in this situation, he has a lot of composure.”

After Kruijswijk stood up to the attacks in Tuesday’s explosive stage, his major rivals have all but surrendered hope of knocking him off. Engels said the team is confident that the Giro will soon be theirs, and they will not repeat the Dumoulin collapse from last year’s Vuelta.

No Dutchman has ever won the Giro and only two have won grand tours. In fact, it’s been nearly 36 years since a Dutch rider won a grand tour, with Joop Zoetemelk winning the 1980 Tour de France. Zoetemelk also won the 1979 Vuelta a España, while Jan Janssen won the 1967 Vuelta and 1968 Tour.

Just like last year with Dumoulin, there’s growing anticipation and excitement that the Netherlands will soon claim another grand tour. Everyone is hoping for a different ending.

Last year, Engels admitted it was a letdown when Dumoulin couldn’t hold off Astana’s Fabio Aru to win the Vuelta, but said things are looking much better for Kruijswijk in this Giro.

“Last year, it was a nice surprise with Tom to ride so well in the Vuelta, and for him to lose it on that last big stage of course was a disappointment,” Engels said. “With Steven, we have two more hard stages, but if we don’t win now, it will be because we lose it.”

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Results: 2016 Giro d’Italia, stage 17

May 25, 2016 - 10:39am

Cycling: 99th Tour of Italy 2016 / Stage 17 Podium / Roger KLUGE (GER)/ Celebration / Champagne / Molveno - Cassano d'Adda (196km)/ / Giro / © Tim De Waele

  • 1. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, in 4:31:29
  • 2. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :00
  • 3. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :00
  • 4. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :00
  • 5. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 6. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 7. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 8. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 9. Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 10. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 11. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 12. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 13. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :00
  • 14. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 15. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at :00
  • 16. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 17. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at :00
  • 18. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 19. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 20. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :00
  • 21. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 22. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 23. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 24. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 25. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 26. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 27. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 28. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 29. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 30. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 31. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 32. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 33. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 34. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :00
  • 35. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 36. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at :00
  • 37. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 38. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 39. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 40. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 41. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 42. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at :00
  • 43. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 44. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 45. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 46. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 47. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at :00
  • 48. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 49. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :00
  • 50. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 51. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 52. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 53. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 54. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 55. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 56. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 57. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 58. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 59. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 60. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 61. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 62. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 63. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 64. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at :00
  • 65. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 66. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at :00
  • 67. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :00
  • 68. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 69. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 70. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 71. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 72. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 73. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 74. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at :00
  • 75. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 76. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 77. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 78. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 79. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :00
  • 80. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 81. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :18
  • 82. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :18
  • 83. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :27
  • 84. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :30
  • 85. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at :35
  • 86. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at :35
  • 87. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :35
  • 88. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :35
  • 89. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :35
  • 90. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at :35
  • 91. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at :35
  • 92. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at :38
  • 93. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :40
  • 94. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at :42
  • 95. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 96. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 97. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 98. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :50
  • 99. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :50
  • 100. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :50
  • 101. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at :56
  • 102. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 103. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 104. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :56
  • 105. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 106. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :56
  • 107. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at :56
  • 108. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at :56
  • 109. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at :56
  • 110. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :56
  • 111. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at :56
  • 112. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at :56
  • 113. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at :56
  • 114. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:06
  • 115. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:07
  • 116. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:07
  • 117. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 118. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:17
  • 119. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:20
  • 120. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:22
  • 121. Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:40
  • 122. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:46
  • 123. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 1:59
  • 124. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:59
  • 125. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:59
  • 126. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 2:45
  • 127. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 2:45
  • 128. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:45
  • 129. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 130. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 131. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 132. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:45
  • 133. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:45
  • 134. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 135. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 136. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 137. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 138. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 139. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 140. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:45
  • 141. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 2:45
  • 142. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:45
  • 143. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 2:45
  • 144. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:45
  • 145. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:45
  • 146. Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY, at 2:45
  • 147. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:45
  • 148. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:45
  • 149. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:45
  • 150. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:45
  • 151. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 152. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 153. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 154. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 155. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:45
  • 156. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 2:45
  • 157. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 2:45
  • 158. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 159. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:45
  • 160. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 161. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:28
  • 162. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:47
  • DNS Luka MEZGEC, ORICA – GreenEDGE

The post Results: 2016 Giro d’Italia, stage 17 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Kluge defies sprinters in Giro stage 17

May 25, 2016 - 9:15am

Roger Kluge won the Giro's stage 17 in stunning fashion, getting the better of the race's sprinters. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

Only days after the bad news that his IAM team would disband at the end of the season, Roger Kluge gave his squad a much-needed win in stage 17 of the Giro d’Italia Wednesday. The sprint to Cassano d’Adda was disorganized, as a late breakaway was caught in the final kilometers of the 196km race. Kluge took advantage and launched a bold solo attack to catch Filippo Pozzato in the last 250 meters to win. LottoNL – Jumbo’s Steven Kruijswijk kept the overall lead on a day that saw no changes in GC standings.

“It’s a dream. It wasn’t planned at all. I was working for Heinrich Haussler, closing the gap for him but I saw a possibility to get away,” said Kluge, 30. “The finishing line was very near. It’s a strange feeling. Yesterday we were very disappointed to hear that our team is going to stop at the end of the year but we decided to stick together and it’s wonderful to come up with a victory to make it up for our disappointment.”

Stage 17, top 10
  • 1. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, in 4:31:29
  • 2. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :00
  • 3. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :00
  • 4. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :00
  • 5. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 6. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 7. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 8. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 9. Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 10. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at :00

 

Top-10 overall
  • 1. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, in 68:11:39
  • 2. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:00
  • 3. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:23
  • 4. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:43
  • 5. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 4:50
  • 6. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 5:34
  • 7. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:57
  • 8. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 8:53
  • 9. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 10:05
  • 10. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 11:03

 

After two kilometers, Daniel Oss (BMC Racing), Pavel Brutt (Tinkoff), and Eugert Zhupa (Wilier Triestina – Southeast) broke free off the front. The break immediately gained time on the peloton, with the gap at 2:30 after 14km and up to 5:50 by the 50km mark.

With the break in striking distance, Lars Bak (Lotto – Soudal), Pavel Brutt (Tinkoff), and Ignatas Konovalovas (FDJ) attacked from the peloton and bridged up to the three leaders with about 25 kilometers to go.

Though peloton’s chase was not particularly organized, the gap was down to about 13 seconds with 10km to go. Five kilometers later, the gap held at around 13 seconds. Inside of the final three kilometers, with the peloton in sight, Brutt, picked up the tempo in the break, holding the lead just a bit longer.

Finally, with Lampre – Merida on the front, the break was caught, about 1.5km to go. But straight away, Bak attacked. He faded, and Pozzato rode past, having jumped off the front of the peloton.

Kluge blasted up the right side of the peloton, from about 10 riders back in the bunch. The IAM gave chase in the last 800 meters and caught the Italian in the final 250 leaders. Grinding an enormous gear, seated the entire time, the German swept past the Wilier Triestina – Southeast rider and rode alone to victory.

“I saw that Pozzato was just ahead of me, I was going fast and overtook him at full pelt round the last corner. With 50 meters to go, I turned around and realized I was going to win,” added Kluge, who will be gunning for a track medal in omnium at the Rio Games. “Any medal will do, but if it’s a gold it’ll be like today. That is, I’ll be happiest man in the world,” he said.

On Thursday, the Giro d’Italia rides its longest stage, 244km from Muggiò to Pinerolo. There will be one category 2 climb, about 20km from the finish, which could afford a launchpad for opportunists.

Stage 17 results
  • 1. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, in 4:31:29
  • 2. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :00
  • 3. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :00
  • 4. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :00
  • 5. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 6. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 7. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 8. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 9. Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 10. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 11. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 12. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 13. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :00
  • 14. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 15. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at :00
  • 16. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 17. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at :00
  • 18. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 19. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 20. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :00
  • 21. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 22. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 23. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 24. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 25. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 26. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 27. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 28. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :00
  • 29. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 30. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 31. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 32. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 33. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 34. Jhoan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :00
  • 35. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 36. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at :00
  • 37. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 38. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 39. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 40. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 41. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 42. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at :00
  • 43. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 44. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 45. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 46. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 47. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at :00
  • 48. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :00
  • 49. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :00
  • 50. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 51. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 52. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 53. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 54. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 55. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 56. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at :00
  • 57. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 58. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 59. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 60. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 61. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at :00
  • 62. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 63. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 64. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at :00
  • 65. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 66. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at :00
  • 67. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :00
  • 68. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 69. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at :00
  • 70. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :00
  • 71. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 72. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :00
  • 73. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :00
  • 74. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at :00
  • 75. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at :00
  • 76. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :00
  • 77. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 78. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :00
  • 79. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :00
  • 80. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :00
  • 81. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :18
  • 82. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :18
  • 83. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at :27
  • 84. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at :30
  • 85. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at :35
  • 86. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at :35
  • 87. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at :35
  • 88. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at :35
  • 89. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at :35
  • 90. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at :35
  • 91. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at :35
  • 92. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at :38
  • 93. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :40
  • 94. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at :42
  • 95. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 96. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 97. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :50
  • 98. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :50
  • 99. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :50
  • 100. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :50
  • 101. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at :56
  • 102. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 103. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 104. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at :56
  • 105. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :56
  • 106. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :56
  • 107. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at :56
  • 108. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at :56
  • 109. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at :56
  • 110. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at :56
  • 111. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at :56
  • 112. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at :56
  • 113. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at :56
  • 114. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:06
  • 115. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:07
  • 116. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:07
  • 117. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at :00
  • 118. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:17
  • 119. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:20
  • 120. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:22
  • 121. Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:40
  • 122. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:46
  • 123. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 1:59
  • 124. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:59
  • 125. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:59
  • 126. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 2:45
  • 127. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 2:45
  • 128. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:45
  • 129. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 130. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 131. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 132. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:45
  • 133. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:45
  • 134. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 135. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 136. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 137. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:45
  • 138. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 139. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 140. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:45
  • 141. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 2:45
  • 142. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:45
  • 143. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 2:45
  • 144. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:45
  • 145. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:45
  • 146. Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY, at 2:45
  • 147. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:45
  • 148. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:45
  • 149. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:45
  • 150. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:45
  • 151. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:45
  • 152. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:45
  • 153. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 154. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 155. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:45
  • 156. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 2:45
  • 157. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 2:45
  • 158. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45
  • 159. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:45
  • 160. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:45
  • 161. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:28
  • 162. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 4:47
  • DNS Luka MEZGEC, ORICA – GreenEDGE

 

General classification
  • 1. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, in 68:11:39
  • 2. Johan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:00
  • 3. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:23
  • 4. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 4:43
  • 5. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 4:50
  • 6. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, at 5:34
  • 7. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 7:57
  • 8. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 8:53
  • 9. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 10:05
  • 10. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, at 11:03
  • 11. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 11:21
  • 12. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 13:53
  • 13. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 20:47
  • 14. Hubert DUPONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 22:13
  • 15. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 22:14
  • 16. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 26:58
  • 17. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, at 29:06
  • 18. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 30:11
  • 19. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 30:26
  • 20. Andre Fernando S. Martins CARDOSO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 31:36
  • 21. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 34:28
  • 22. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 38:28
  • 23. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 40:49
  • 24. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 42:35
  • 25. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 43:06
  • 26. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 48:58
  • 27. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, at 50:22
  • 28. Andrey ZEITS, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 50:30
  • 29. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 55:36
  • 30. Pavel KOCHETKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 58:21
  • 31. Igor ANTON HERNANDEZ, DIMENSION DATA, at 59:42
  • 32. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:01:37
  • 33. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, at 1:01:44
  • 34. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:06:21
  • 35. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:11:54
  • 36. Rein TAARAMAE, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:12:15
  • 37. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:18:58
  • 38. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 1:19:06
  • 39. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, at 1:19:41
  • 40. Pawel POLJANSKI, TINKOFF, at 1:21:23
  • 41. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 1:25:27
  • 42. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, at 1:25:55
  • 43. Davide MALACARNE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:27:22
  • 44. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:28:01
  • 45. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:28:04
  • 46. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:28:12
  • 47. Egor SILIN, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:33:46
  • 48. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 1:36:41
  • 49. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 1:38:19
  • 50. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:44:29
  • 51. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 1:44:57
  • 52. Jesus HERNANDEZ BLAZQUEZ, TINKOFF, at 1:46:25
  • 53. Guillaume BONNAFOND, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:48:51
  • 54. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:50:00
  • 55. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:52:42
  • 56. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 1:54:10
  • 57. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:54:51
  • 58. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 1:55:41
  • 59. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, at 1:59:25
  • 60. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:00:36
  • 61. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:00:48
  • 62. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:02:24
  • 63. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:08:00
  • 64. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 2:08:46
  • 65. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:08:52
  • 66. Carlos Alberto BETANCUR GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:09:11
  • 67. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:13:06
  • 68. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, at 2:13:38
  • 69. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:14:15
  • 70. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:15:41
  • 71. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:15:43
  • 72. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:19:54
  • 73. Evgeny PETROV, TINKOFF, at 2:22:13
  • 74. Christian KNEES, TEAM SKY, at 2:22:19
  • 75. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:22:28
  • 76. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:24:15
  • 77. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, at 2:24:24
  • 78. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:24:31
  • 79. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:24:40
  • 80. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:24:50
  • 81. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:25:26
  • 82. Hugo HOULE, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:27:46
  • 83. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:27:49
  • 84. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:28:30
  • 85. Chad HAGA, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:28:32
  • 86. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:30:43
  • 87. Jelle VANENDERT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:32:12
  • 88. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:32:57
  • 89. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:33:49
  • 90. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 2:33:50
  • 91. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:34:06
  • 92. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 2:35:02
  • 93. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:36:00
  • 94. Rory SUTHERLAND, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:37:02
  • 95. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:37:10
  • 96. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:37:49
  • 97. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:38:03
  • 98. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF, at 2:38:29
  • 99. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:38:35
  • 100. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:38:43
  • 101. Francesco Manuel BONGIORNO, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:38:49
  • 102. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:39:19
  • 103. Eros CAPECCHI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:39:54
  • 104. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, at 2:40:31
  • 105. Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:41:27
  • 106. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 2:43:33
  • 107. Philip DEIGNAN, TEAM SKY, at 2:44:19
  • 108. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:44:44
  • 109. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, at 2:44:48
  • 110. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:45:42
  • 111. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, at 2:47:56
  • 112. Twan CASTELIJNS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:48:06
  • 113. Filippo POZZATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:48:36
  • 114. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 2:49:17
  • 115. Maxim BELKOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 2:50:26
  • 116. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:51:15
  • 117. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 2:51:34
  • 118. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:53:52
  • 119. Martijn KEIZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:54:05
  • 120. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:54:37
  • 121. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 2:55:45
  • 122. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:58:43
  • 123. Alexander SEROV, GAZ, at 3:01:19
  • 124. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:01:47
  • 125. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:02:57
  • 126. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:03:08
  • 127. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 3:03:51
  • 128. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:05:11
  • 129. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:05:46
  • 130. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 3:05:58
  • 131. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:07:23
  • 132. Gianfranco ZILIOLI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:08:22
  • 133. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:09:53
  • 134. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, at 3:11:20
  • 135. Grega BOLE, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:11:46
  • 136. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, at 3:12:51
  • 137. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 3:13:58
  • 138. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:13:58
  • 139. Sam BEWLEY, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:14:00
  • 140. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:14:58
  • 141. Andrei SOLOMENNIKOV, GAZ, at 3:15:05
  • 142. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:15:38
  • 143. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:16:01
  • 144. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:16:07
  • 145. Tom STAMSNIJDER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:18:12
  • 146. Songezo JIM, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:19:44
  • 147. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, at 3:21:20
  • 148. Artem OVECHKIN, GAZ, at 3:22:20
  • 149. Svein TUFT, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:22:46
  • 150. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:22:58
  • 151. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:23:30
  • 152. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, at 3:25:22
  • 153. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:26:20
  • 154. Jay Robert THOMSON, DIMENSION DATA, at 3:26:45
  • 155. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:26:50
  • 156. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, at 3:27:27
  • 157. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:28:45
  • 158. Murilo Antonio FISCHER, FDJ, at 3:29:41
  • 159. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:39:07
  • 160. Cheng JI, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:43:24
  • 161. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:44:45
  • 162. Jack BOBRIDGE, TREK – SEGAFREDO, at 3:48:33

 

Points classification
  • 1. Giacomo NIZZOLO, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 185 points
  • 2. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 137 points
  • 3. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 123 points
  • 4. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 107 points
  • 5. Sacha MODOLO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 102 points
  • 6. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 83 points
  • 7. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 83 points
  • 8. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 76 points
  • 9. Alexander PORSEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 62 points
  • 10. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 61 points
  • 11. Andrey AMADOR BIKKAZAKOVA, MOVISTAR TEAM, 57 points
  • 12. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, 51 points
  • 13. Roger KLUGE, IAM CYCLING, 50 points
  • 14. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, 47 points
  • 15. Anton VOROBYEV, TEAM KATUSHA, 46 points
  • 16. Sonny COLBRELLI, BARDIANI CSF, 46 points
  • 17. Kristian SBARAGLI, DIMENSION DATA, 44 points
  • 18. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 40 points
  • 19. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 39 points
  • 20. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 39 points
  • 21. Jhoan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 38 points
  • 22. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 36 points
  • 23. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 32 points
  • 24. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 32 points
  • 25. Manuel BELLETTI, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 31 points
  • 26. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 30 points
  • 27. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 30 points
  • 28. Vegard Stake LAENGEN, IAM CYCLING, 29 points
  • 29. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 28 points
  • 30. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 28 points
  • 31. Primož ROGLIC, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 27 points
  • 32. Pim LIGTHART, LOTTO SOUDAL, 27 points
  • 33. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, 24 points
  • 34. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, 24 points
  • 35. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 23 points
  • 36. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 21 points
  • 37. Pieter SERRY, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 20 points
  • 38. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF, 20 points
  • 39. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 40. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 19 points
  • 41. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 18 points
  • 42. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 17 points
  • 43. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, 17 points
  • 44. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 16 points
  • 45. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 16 points
  • 46. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 16 points
  • 47. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 16 points
  • 48. Amets TXURRUKA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 16 points
  • 49. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 16 points
  • 50. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 15 points
  • 51. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, 14 points
  • 52. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 14 points
  • 53. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 14 points
  • 54. Mickael DELAGE, FDJ, 14 points
  • 55. Marco COLEDAN, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 13 points
  • 56. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, 13 points
  • 57. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 12 points
  • 58. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 12 points
  • 59. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 12 points
  • 60. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 12 points
  • 61. Rigoberto URAN URAN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 11 points
  • 62. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 11 points
  • 63. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 10 points
  • 64. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 10 points
  • 65. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 10 points
  • 66. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 10 points
  • 67. Heinrich HAUSSLER, IAM CYCLING, 9 points
  • 68. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 9 points
  • 69. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 8 points
  • 70. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 8 points
  • 71. Matteo BUSATO, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 8 points
  • 72. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 73. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 7 points
  • 74. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 7 points
  • 75. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 6 points
  • 76. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 6 points
  • 77. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 78. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 5 points
  • 79. Viacheslav KUZNETSOV, TEAM KATUSHA, 4 points
  • 80. Biel KADRI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 4 points
  • 81. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 3 points
  • 82. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 3 points
  • 83. Laurent DIDIER, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 3 points
  • 84. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 3 points
  • 85. Ignatas KONOVALOVAS, FDJ, 3 points
  • 86. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 3 points
  • 87. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 88. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 89. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 2 points
  • 90. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, 2 points
  • 91. Eugenio ALAFACI, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 2 points
  • 92. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 93. Riccardo ZOIDL, TREK – SEGAFREDO, 1 point
  • 94. Manuele BOARO, TINKOFF, 1 point
  • 95. Roberto FERRARI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 1 point
  • 96. Arnaud COURTEILLE, FDJ, 1 point
  • 97. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, 1 point

 

Mountains classification
  • 1. Damiano CUNEGO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 134 points
  • 2. Stefan DENIFL, IAM CYCLING, 72 points
  • 3. Darwin ATAPUMA HURTADO, BMC RACING TEAM, 69 points
  • 4. Giovanni VISCONTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 61 points
  • 5. David LOPEZ GARCIA, TEAM SKY, 54 points
  • 6. Mikel NIEVE ITURALDE, TEAM SKY, 50 points
  • 7. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 42 points
  • 8. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, 41 points
  • 9. Kanstantsin SIUTSOU, DIMENSION DATA, 36 points
  • 10. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 27 points
  • 11. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, 27 points
  • 12. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, 26 points
  • 13. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 23 points
  • 14. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 21 points
  • 15. Matteo MONTAGUTI, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 20 points
  • 16. Ilnur ZAKARIN, TEAM KATUSHA, 18 points
  • 17. Stefano PIRAZZI, BARDIANI CSF, 18 points
  • 18. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 18 points
  • 19. Sergey FIRSANOV, GAZ, 17 points
  • 20. Gianluca BRAMBILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 16 points
  • 21. Alessandro BISOLTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, 16 points
  • 22. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, 15 points
  • 23. Ivan ROVNY, TINKOFF, 15 points
  • 24. Jhoan Esteban CHAVES RUBIO, ORICA – GreenEDGE, 14 points
  • 25. Diego ULISSI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 13 points
  • 26. Alessandro DE MARCHI, BMC RACING TEAM, 13 points
  • 27. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 12 points
  • 28. Nicola BOEM, BARDIANI CSF, 11 points
  • 29. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 9 points
  • 30. Manuele MORI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 9 points
  • 31. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 8 points
  • 32. Alexander KOLOBNEV, GAZ, 8 points
  • 33. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, 8 points
  • 34. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, 8 points
  • 35. Eugert ZHUPA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 8 points
  • 36. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, 7 points
  • 37. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 7 points
  • 38. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 6 points
  • 39. Jose Joaquin ROJAS GIL, MOVISTAR TEAM, 6 points
  • 40. Simon CLARKE, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 6 points
  • 41. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 6 points
  • 42. Maarten TJALLINGII, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 5 points
  • 43. Axel DOMONT, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 5 points
  • 44. Enrico BATTAGLIN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 4 points
  • 45. Joseph ROSSKOPF, BMC RACING TEAM, 4 points
  • 46. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, 3 points
  • 47. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 3 points
  • 48. Moreno MOSER, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, 3 points
  • 49. Maxime MONFORT, LOTTO SOUDAL, 2 points
  • 50. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 2 points
  • 51. Jaco VENTER, DIMENSION DATA, 2 points
  • 52. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, 2 points
  • 53. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 1 point
  • 54. Domenico POZZOVIVO, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 1 point
  • 55. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, 1 point
  • 56. Pavel BRUTT, TINKOFF, 1 point
  • 57. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, 1 point

 

Youth classification
  • 1. Bob JUNGELS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, in 68:19:36
  • 2. Sebastian HENAO GOMEZ, TEAM SKY, at 14:17
  • 3. Davide FORMOLO, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 34:38
  • 4. Valerio CONTI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 53:40
  • 5. Joseph Lloyd DOMBROWSKI, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:03:57
  • 6. Carlos VERONA QUINTANILLA, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:11:01
  • 7. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, DIMENSION DATA, at 1:20:04
  • 8. Damien HOWSON, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 1:30:22
  • 9. Nathan BROWN, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 1:36:32
  • 10. Tobias LUDVIGSSON, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:42:03
  • 11. Alexander FOLIFOROV, GAZ, at 1:46:13
  • 12. Giulio CICCONE, BARDIANI CSF, at 1:47:44
  • 13. Stefan KUENG, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:52:51
  • 14. Manuel SENNI, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:54:27
  • 15. Simone PETILLI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:06:18
  • 16. Bakhtiyar KOZHATAYEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:11:57
  • 17. Alberto BETTIOL, CANNONDALE PRO CYCLING TEAM, at 2:16:43
  • 18. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:16:53
  • 19. Johann VAN ZYL, DIMENSION DATA, at 2:17:29
  • 20. Cristian RODRIGUEZ MARTIN, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:25:00
  • 21. Ivan SAVITSKIY, GAZ, at 2:25:53
  • 22. Nikias ARNDT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:29:13
  • 23. Daniel MARTÍNEZ, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:29:52
  • 24. Ian BOSWELL, TEAM SKY, at 2:30:06
  • 25. Sean DE BIE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 2:30:38
  • 26. Matej MOHORIC, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:36:47
  • 27. Jay MCCARTHY, TINKOFF, at 2:37:45
  • 28. Mirco MAESTRI, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:45:55
  • 29. Ilia KOSHEVOY, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 2:46:40
  • 30. Jasha SÜTTERLIN, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 2:50:46
  • 31. Paolo SIMION, BARDIANI CSF, at 2:55:11
  • 32. Julen AMEZQUETA, WILIER TRIESTINA – SOUTHEAST, at 2:58:01
  • 33. Aleksey RYBALKIN, GAZ, at 3:06:01
  • 34. Lukasz WISNIOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 3:07:01
  • 35. Rick ZABEL, BMC RACING TEAM, at 3:08:04
  • 36. Simone ANDREETTA, BARDIANI CSF, at 3:08:10
  • 37. Michael HEPBURN, ORICA – GreenEDGE, at 3:18:23
  • 38. Olivier LE GAC, FDJ, at 3:18:53
  • 39. Eduard Michael GROSU, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:20:48
  • 40. Genki YAMAMOTO, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:31:10
  • 41. Riccardo STACCHIOTTI, NIPPO – VINI FANTINI, at 3:36:48

 

Teams classification
  • 1. Astana Pro Team, in 205:05:14
  • 2. Movistar Team, at 7:46
  • 3. Ag2R La Mondiale, at 23:23
  • 4. Cannondale Pro Cycling Team, at 24:54
  • 5. Team Sky, at 39:44
  • 6. Etixx – Quick Step, at 1:06:07
  • 7. Team Katusha, at 1:06:42
  • 8. Tinkoff, at 1:10:35
  • 9. Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 1:49:33
  • 10. Team Dimension Data, at 1:52:26
  • 11. Orica Greenedge, at 2:23:53
  • 12. Lampre – Merida, at 2:33:25
  • 13. Bmc Racing Team, at 2:40:58
  • 14. Trek Factory Racing, at 3:01:24
  • 15. Bardiani Csf, at 3:16:13
  • 16. Team Giant – Alpecin, at 3:22:53
  • 17. Lotto Soudal, at 3:34:04
  • 18. Gazprom-Rusvelo, at 3:44:15
  • 19. Iam Cycling, at 4:42:38
  • 20. Wilier Triestina – Southeast, at 5:00:07
  • 21. Nippo – Vini Fantini, at 5:21:38
  • 22. Fdj, at 8:06:51

The post Kluge defies sprinters in Giro stage 17 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Reviewed: Trek Domane 6.5

May 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Photo: Trek

Lab data: 17.7/20 (1.12mm head tube deflection; .53mm BB deflection)
Build: 13.9/15
Comfort: 13.5/15
Value: 11.5/15
Handling: 10.5/15
Pedaling response: 12.0/15
Aesthetics: 3.5/5

Overall 82.6/100

The Domane delivers something approaching the perfect balance of comfort and efficiency. In large part, that’s due to the IsoSpeed decoupler, which lets the seat tube flex independently of the top tube. But you also get Trek’s second-tier 600 series OCLV carbon and beefy BB90 bottom bracket (think: stiff and light).

That said, the Domane responds best to seated accelerations. When you stand, the frame’s slack, 160-millimeter head tube (size 54cm) feels tall and clumsy. We were often compelled to sit back down after standing to attack steep grades. Better to grind it out from the saddle than fight the handlebars all the way to the top.

We also weren’t so fond of the front end’s behavior under hard cornering. This is probably a combination of that tall front end, the 71.3-degree head angle, 5.9-centimeter trail, and the fact that the Domane’s head tube was quite flexy — in fact, it was the worst of the road bikes we tested, a strange contrast to its very stout BB.

The clunky Bontrager Paradigm wheels were the only letdown in an otherwise excellent build, but wheels are so critical to a bike’s personality. They only served to exaggerate the Domane’s sleepy handling. As such, it’s a steady-handed all-rounder that is comfortable and relaxed.

Editor’s note: Trek recently launched a new version of the Domane. Read our first ride review of that bike >>

Price: $6,000
Component highlights: Shimano Dura-Ace drivetrain with 50/34 crankset and 11-28 cassette; Shimano Dura-Ace brakes; Bontrager Paradigm Elite tubeless-ready wheels
Weight: 14.5 pounds (size 54cm)

More VeloNews Buyer’s Guide reviews >>

The post Reviewed: Trek Domane 6.5 appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves’s Scott Addict

May 25, 2016 - 6:41am

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  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Esteban Chaves rode the featherweight Scott Addict to float through the Italian Dolomites. The carbon frame is Scott’s lightest, weighing in around one kilogram. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    The Columbian rider set up the Esteban Chaves Foundation to help develop a new generation of young talents from Bogota and Cundinamarca. The foundation offers structured training and technique programs as well as support with racing to help launch these young riders into professionals. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    As a Shimano-sponsored team, Orica – GreenEdge uses Pro (Shimano’s component line) seatposts, handlebars, and stems to build each bike. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Chaves’ cheat sheet not only includes the location of important points on the day’s stage, but it shows the max gradient and length of each climb as well. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Select Orica – GreenEdge riders have been racing with Velon cameras on their bikes for an inside look at what it’s like to ride in the peloton. The cameras can be mounted off the handlebars or on the back of the saddle. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    The 5-foot-5 Chaves uses a 110-millimeter Pro stem. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Shimano’s Di2 sprint shifters are also handy for fast descents so riders can quickly and easily shift with their thumbs with the click of a button. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    For climbing stages, Chaves uses Shimano’s Dura-Ace C35 tubular wheels. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Like the majority of teams at the Giro, Orica is racing on Continental Competition tubular tires. Chaves opts for the 25mm version on the rough mountain roads. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    An SRM chain catcher is installed to help prevent a dropped chain that could cost Chaves precious time. So far, we haven’t seen the Columbian have any serious mechanical issues. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    We’ve seen most riders using the 53-39 chainring setups at the Giro this year. Chaves is no different as he headed back into the mountains for the final week of racing. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    An 11-28 cassette paired with the 53-39 chainrings provides a wide range of gears for the ups and downs of the Giro. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Orica adds extra sponsor stickers along the Addict’s chainstays for added visibility. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Orica uses Italian-made Elite bottles and cages. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Even with a setback Pro seatpost, Chaves runs his saddle toward the front of the rails for a long position over the bike. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Chaves opts for the classic Fizik Antares saddle for his run at the Giro. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    A custom number holder is attached via the rear brake to keep Chaves’ 141 snugly in place and easy to see. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Orica's mechanics cut down the riders' number plates to fit snugly within the angles of the Addict. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Chaves’ teammate Michael Hepburn wanted a vest for the stage, so Orica mechanics stuffed the extra layer in an open water bottle for easy access while riding. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike Gallery: Esteban Chaves' Scott Addict

    Orica’s Svein Tuft was the rider of choice for Velon cameras on this stage. The cameras record the day’s action from inside the race and Velon has been posting videos on YouTube throughout the Giro. Photo: Kristen Legan | VeloNews.com

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The Shot: Lonely suffering at the Giro

May 25, 2016 - 3:08am

Photo: Jim Fryer / BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

The post The Shot: Lonely suffering at the Giro appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Caleb Fairly hangs up the wheels after California

May 24, 2016 - 3:43pm

Caleb Fairly is moving on from his pro racing career, but he won't be leaving the cycling community. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

Caleb Fairly put his Giant – Alpecin kit on for the final time Sunday at the Tour of California. The 29-year-old American announced a week ago that the race would be his last, but he won’t be leaving cycling for good.

“I had the chance to stop in California with my family, and in the United States, and I couldn’t pass that up,” Fairly said of his decision to end his career in May. “My head just wasn’t in it, and I haven’t been as motivated.

“It’s hard to leave, but it feels good,” Fairly said. The fact that it’s difficult to retire is a good sign; “it means that there are a lot of good memories. I think that if it was easy, then it would mean that it [racing] was miserable, and it wasn’t,” he said.

What’s next for the Giant – Alpecin rider? “My wife is due the 28th, so we’re going to sit around and wait for that to happen,” he said.

Even after the new arrival, he won’t be sitting around for long. Fairly’s father is the president of the Fairly Group, an insurance group based in Amarillo, Texas, specializing in risk management. The younger Fairly plans to work in a similar capacity as his father, as an agent and insurance representative for cyclists and other athletes. He already has riders lined up for next season and expressed confidence that his family business’s expertise will have a positive impact on the professionalism of cycling.

Fairly raced bikes for 10 years, but his professional career was relatively short. He signed his first pro-level contract in August of 2010, racing as a trainee for Garmin – Transitions. Earlier that year, racing as an amateur, he won the Tour of the Battenkill, beating Floyd Landis by almost two and a half minutes.

After the victory in Battenkill, he placed third in the Giro della Toscana, racing for the Garmin squad. In 2011, he signed with HTC – High Road, where he rode for a year until the team folded before the 2012 season.

Once his team folded, Fairly returned to race in the United States with the Canadian Pro Continental team Spidertech. The following year, 2013, he was back in the WorldTour peloton, racing for Garmin – Sharp, where he spent the next two years. His best result was 11th in the Gran Premio Miguel Indurain in 2014. In 2015, he signed a contract with Giant – Alpecin.

Professional racing is difficult, at times quite miserable. But Fairly has no regrets. “There are moments in a race, or after you finish, where you say ‘I need to block that out’ but when it’s all going away, you relish those moments.”

One such moment for Fairly was this year’s edition of Liège-Bastogne-Liège in April. “It was a brutal, miserable race, but it’s a memory I’ll really cherish and hold on to because it was so epic. The good and the bad parts, they all made it what it [his career] what it was, so I’ll take it all.”

He made friends that he will keep forever, he said, and will miss many of his teammates.

Overall, Fairly feels relief, and some sadness, that his career is coming to an end. There are people he will keep in touch with, teammates and staffers from all of his teams, and not just the folks from Giant, but it’s hard to say goodbye.

“I’ll miss the camaraderie and just hanging out with the guys on the bus before and after the race and during the transfers. Just the camaraderie you have when you’re spending six hours out there climbing 15,000 feet. I’m definitely going to miss that,” he said.

For Fairly, the final week of racing was all about soaking everything in: “The last mountaintop finish, the last time trial. The last moments on the bus, and team breakfasts. I’m enjoying it all and soaking it all in. It’s a little bit of relief and a little bit of sadness.”

Fairly is excited for the next chapter of his life, and gaining the control that cyclists on professional teams give up. “I got tired of people taking care of my life for me. I prefer to remain in control,” he said.

While he is excited, he knows that the transition will be difficult. He also feels confident about his decision to end his career.

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IAM riders urged to stick together at Giro

May 24, 2016 - 12:20pm

Heinrich Haussler and his IAM team face an uncertain future heading into the Giro's final mountain stages, but he's confident there is enough time to find a new team. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com (File).

ANDALO, Italy (VN) — Riders and staff on the soon-to-disband IAM WorldTour team have been urged to “stick together” and race as one at the Giro d’Italia, rather than try to impress as individuals and shore up new contracts for next year, Heinrich Haussler said.

One of 28 riders on the IAM roster, the Australian said IAM riders and staff learned that the team will stop after this year in an email from IAM owner Michel Thétaz that they received “a couple of hours” before the Swiss businessman’s decision was made public on Monday.

After each recipient of Thétaz’s email at the Giro absorbed its contents on Monday morning — during the third rest day of the Giro that finishes in Torino on Sunday — they then met in the team bus under the instruction of the team’s Belgian sports director Rik Verbrugge.

It was then that Verbrugge told them to work together to finish off the Giro, according Haussler on Tuesday morning before stage 16 from Bressanone to Andolo.

“Obviously the staff and some of the riders were a little bit upset,” said Haussler. “But Rik told us, ‘Now we really need to keep together as a team and not try to do individual things … that it’s because we only can get results as a team. We have to try to stick together.’ He gave us a good talk, kept us in a good mood, a positive attitude to look towards the future.”

The future of IAM had been uncertain for some time as Thétaz, who owns the financial management company IAM [Independent Asset Management] looked for another sponsor in vain. But Haussler said the team, which includes Leigh Howard, Mathias Frank, Matteo Pelucchi, and Mathias Brandle, had expected a decision “sometime” in May.

However, the harsh reality of Thétaz’s final call to stop the team was still a blow. “We all got an email from Michel — one or two hours before the press release,” Haussler said. “I don’t think anyone else from the team knew; for example, the [other] sports directors and Rik got the same email as we did. For a lot of staff and riders it was a shock.”

However, Haussler said he respected Thétaz for making his decision now, rather than later in the year and leave everyone in doubt, and possibly without time to find a new team.

“You have to say it is fair because it’s May. It’s not August or September,” Haussler said. “You also have to remember that it’s his own money out of his own pocket. It’s not, for example, Coca-Cola or other big companies where they just throw away the money like that.

“It’s a lot of money. You have to hand it to him that he did it [created the team] in the first place.”

Haussler said that for all the riders in the IAM team, which began in 2013 and was promoted to WorldTour last year, there is still plenty of time for them to pursue new contracts this year.

Asked if the Giro team would now use the setback as motivation, Haussler said, “Exactly. The riders have their own future in their own hands. They want to get a contract, or they need a contract … then they need to get out there in the groups or try and get a good result.

“I’ve been in situations with Cervelo or Gerolsteiner, where we only got the news [of those teams stopping] in September or October, and you stand there pretty much with nothing.

“It’s still really hard. It’s not an easy situation for anyone when a team stops. But it is May and opportunities are still there to perform and put yourself out there and show yourself.”

Haussler said the possibility of the team folding had led him to consider his future. But while the 32-year-old does not know his fate, he reaffirmed his desire to join another WorldTour team.

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Peloton sees Kruijswijk as Giro winner

May 24, 2016 - 11:51am

Steven Kruijswijk has been calm, consistent, and downright impressive in the Giro's mountains so far. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

ANDOLO, Italy (VN) — No one pegged Steven Kruijswijk as a winner of the 2016 Giro d’Italia, but with five stages to go, everyone inside the peloton agrees it’s the LottoNL – Jumbo rider’s pink jersey to lose.

“[Kruijswijk] hasn’t shown any weakness yet,” said Orica – GreenEdge sport director Matt White. “He’s the strongest guy here. Unless he shows a weakness between here and Sunday, he’ll be the winner of the Giro.”

That near-universal consensus was reconfirmed in Tuesday’s short, explosive stage that saw the GC favorites taking potshots at each other right from the gun, but it was Kruijswijk who stomped the hardest.

The Dutch climber smothered attacks from stage-winner Alejandro Valverde (Movistar) and Vincenzo Nibali (Astana) early in the stage, and then gapped podium rival Esteban Chaves (Orica – GreenEdge) to finish second for the third consecutive stage to widen his maglia rosa lead to 3:00.

At the line, Valverde out-kicked Kruijswijk and fellow attacker Ilnur Zakarin (Katusha) to win the stage, and bounced into third overall at 3:23 ahead of Nibali, who faltered on the day’s last climb to sink to fourth at 4:43. With only two difficult mountain stages left, Valverde joined the growing chorus that this Giro could be painted in orange.

“He’s looking very strong, and it will be difficult to knock him out,” Valverde said. “From what we saw today, Kruijswijk is clearly the strongest rider in this Giro, and, OK, there are two more hard stages to go, but if he’s like he’s been so far, he will be the winner of this Giro.”

Kruijswijk has been the steadiest and strongest rider so far in a Giro laden with inconsistencies among the top favorites. When the race started in his native Holland, nearly everyone was expecting a GC battle between Nibali and Valverde. Instead, both of those veterans have flagged in key moments, while the 28-year-old Dutchman has surpassed expectations at every major stage.

No one’s more surprised than Kruijswijk to be leading the Giro going into the final week.

“When I started two weeks ago, I didn’t expect to be in the leadership jersey at this time in the Giro,” he said. “I felt good from the beginning, and I was hoping to be at the front of the GC, but to be first is a little bit surprising as well.”

His best Giro result was seventh last year, and he started hoping to better that, with an eye on the top-five, and maybe the podium if things went well. Following his flawless defense of pink in his first road stage in the maglia rosa, Kruijswijk is on track to become the first Dutch winner of the Giro.

“I felt really good today, and I like to be in this jersey,” Kruijswijk said. “I showed myself at the front today, and that means I am still feeling good and in the right position. I hope I can do this for the next few stages.”

Kruijswijk is the steady hand at the top of a still wildly agitated, ever-changing GC that will soon convert into a battle for the podium. After losing time in a disastrous time trial Sunday, Nibali looked to be on the march early, attacking over the day’s first climb to gap Chaves, but he faded when Zakarin and Valverde accelerated, and even slipped behind the chasing Chaves to finish 11th at 1:47. With back-to-back losses, Nibali ceded a podium spot to Valverde.

Chaves, too, ceded ground, but he admitted it was a judgment error, not a lack of firepower.

“Today was a shootout, and I let my guard down,” Chaves said, who got gapped over the day’s first climb. “I saw Nibali and Valverde go with 500m to go on the first climb, and I sat back, thinking it would come back together on the descent, and that was my error.”

Orica’s White said it’s a fight for the podium, with Kruijswijk in the pole position for pink.

“When you’re the strongest guy in the race, you don’t need teammates like the way Sky rides the Tour,” White said. “The Giro is different, the teams aren’t as strong. This year, it’s very much a man-on-man race.”

So far, it’s been the unlikely Kruijswijk who’s stood tall when others have stumbled.

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