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Updated: 49 min 13 sec ago

Americans shine at Lenzerheide MTB World Cup

July 6, 2015 - 4:30pm

The sixth round of the mountain bike World Cup in Lenzerheide, Switzerland saw two Americans earn podium finishes.

Lea Davison (Specialized Factory Racing) earned the silver medal in the elite women’s cross-country race, while another Specialized rider, Howard Grotts captured the bronze medal in the under-23 men’s XC.

After a tight race against current world champion Catherine Pendrel (Luna Pro Team), Davison took second, one minute behind winner Gunn-Rita Dahle Flesjaa (Multivan Merida), who crossed the line in a time of 1:32:15. Pendrel took the bronze medal, finishing 36 seconds behind Davison. The podium place catapulted Davison up to fourth place in the women’s World Cup overall standings with 420 points. Dahle Flesjaa and Jolanda Neff (Stöckli Pro Team) are tied atop the standings with 650 points apiece, and Pendrel has 470 points.

Grotts continued his success at the under-23 level, earning the bronze medal. Grotts spoke to VeloNews earlier this year about his recent run of success. Grotts finished 1:07 behind winner Lars Forster (Wheeler-IXS) who finished in a time of 1:18:14. France’s Titouan Carod (Scott Sports) finished in second at 1:18:36.

The effort moved Grotts into third place in the under-23 men’s World Cup standings with 135 points. Pablo Rodriguez Guede (MMR Factory Racing Team) leads with 240 points followed by Forster at 200 points.

One more round remains in the 2015 World Cup series, at Val di Sole, Italy, August 22-23.

The post Americans shine at Lenzerheide MTB World Cup appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Rodriguez wins Tour stage 3, Froome takes yellow jersey

July 6, 2015 - 4:12pm

Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) attacked stage 3's final climb, the Mur de Huy, to win ahead of Chris Froome (Sky), who claimed the Tour's yellow jersey with his second-place finish. Photo: AFP PHOTO / ERIC FEFERBERG

Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) delivered a devastating attack in the final few hundred meters of racing on the Mur de Huy to win Tour de France stage 3, Monday in Huy, Belgium.

After Chris Froome (Sky) went to the front early on the Mur, with 500 meters to go, the front group disintegrated. Rodriguez was ready for the final, steep kicker and attacked to win just ahead of Froome. Alexis Vuillermoz (Ag2r La Mondiale) finished third.

“The Mur de Huy is something that I know extremely well — I’ve seen it before,” Rodriguez said.

“It was a little bit complicated. I could see that I was starting to feel pretty good, and then the last little move that I made, I was able to make the difference in the end.”

Off the back, in pain from a major crash, Cancellara relinquished the yellow jersey he won only 24 hours earlier.

But his loss was Froome’s gain. The Sky rider couldn’t respond to Rodriguez’s acceleration, but he rode a blistering pace over the false flat at the top to finish second, grab a time bonus, and take the overall lead. Tony Martin (Etixx-Quick-Step) is merely one second behind, in second-place overall; Tejay van Garderen (BMC) is third, 13 seconds back.

“I didn’t wake up today thinking I was going to be in yellow,” said Froome. “That was a real surprise there.

“Today was treacherous. Lots of crashes … Not too different from the Flèche Wallone classic this year. I couldn’t be happier to be in yellow.

“I’m not banking on anything at this point, For sure I’d rather be in the position I’m in now rather than having to make up time on yellow.”

Top 10, stage 3
  • 1. Joaquim RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, in 3:26:54
  • 2. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 3. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :04
  • 4. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :05
  • 5. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :08
  • 6. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, at :11
  • 7. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :11
  • 8. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at :11
  • 9. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :11
  • 10. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at :11

 

Top 10, GC
  • 1. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, in 7:11:37
  • 2. Tony MARTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :01
  • 3. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, at :13
  • 4. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :26
  • 5. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, at :28
  • 6. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :31
  • 7. Rigoberto URAN URAN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :34
  • 8. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :36
  • 9. Geraint THOMAS, TEAM SKY, at 1:03
  • 10. Zdenek STYBAR, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:04

The 157km run from Antwerp to Huy, Belgium was marred by a major crash that ruined the day for Cancellara and several other notable riders.

At about 59km to go, a rider clipped wheels near the front end of the peloton, causing a crash that was impossible to avoid for riders powering along the right side of the road.

At least 12 hit the tarmac, many with serious injuries. Race leader Cancellara was sent catapulting into the grass. Tom Dumoulin (Giant-Alpecin), Simon Gerrans (Orica-GreenEdge), and Laurens Ten Dam (LottoNL-Jumbo) were among those who abandoned.

The race was temporarily neutralized, then stopped at the base of the Cote de Bohissau.

Once the race regrouped and restarted after the category 4 climb, Astana split the peloton with 40km left. Tinkoff-Saxo was in the mix as well, as the crosswinds guttered riders at the back of the field.

Cancellara was caught behind the split and appeared to be in pain.

After the intermediate sprint in Havelange, won by green jersey Andre Greipel (Lotto-Soudal), the race regrouped.

However, Cancellara was clearly struggling, dropped by the field with 20 kilometers to go.

As the peloton climbed the Cote de Cherave, in advance of the Mur de Huy, Rafal Majka (Tinkoff-Saxo) drove the pace.

Trek Factory Racing’s Bob Jungels kicked off the hostilities just before the final kilometer, but he was soon swallowed up by the peloton.

As one of Katusha’s pacemakers sat up on the Mur, Froome went to the front with 500m to go, and Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) was right on his wheel.

Rodrgiuez then made his move, grinding up the steep pitch on the right side. None could respond, and the Spaniard punched the pedals all the way to the line to win ahead of Froome.

On Tuesday, the Tour takes on the cobblestones with a fearsome 221.5km ride from Seraing to Cambrai, France.

Stage 3 results
  • 1. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, in 3:26:54
  • 2. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 3. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :04
  • 4. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :05
  • 5. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :08
  • 6. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, at :11
  • 7. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :11
  • 8. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at :11
  • 9. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :11
  • 10. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at :11
  • 11. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :11
  • 12. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :18
  • 13. Julian David ARREDONDO MORENO, TREK FACTORY RACING, at :19
  • 14. Robert GESINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :22
  • 15. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, at :22
  • 16. Jean-Christophe PERAUD, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :24
  • 17. Warren BARGUIL, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :24
  • 18. Julien SIMON, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at :28
  • 19. Rigoberto URAN URAN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :34
  • 20. Pierre ROLLAND, TEAM EUROPCAR, at :36
  • 21. Romain BARDET, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :36
  • 22. Louis MEINTJES, MTN – QHUBEKA, at :36
  • 23. Cyril GAUTIER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at :36
  • 24. Ryder HESJEDAL, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :40
  • 25. Andrew TALANSKY, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :40
  • 26. Tony MARTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :40
  • 27. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :40
  • 28. Eduardo SEPULVEDA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at :45
  • 29. Daniel NAVARRO GARCIA, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at :45
  • 30. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at :45
  • 31. Zdenek STYBAR, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :52
  • 32. Adam YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 1:00
  • 33. Giampaolo CARUSO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:05
  • 34. Jan BAKELANTS, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:08
  • 35. Samuel SANCHEZ GONZALEZ, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:10
  • 36. Geraint THOMAS, TEAM SKY, at 1:10
  • 37. Luis Angel MATE MARDONES, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 1:10
  • 38. Rui Alberto FARIA DA COSTA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:13
  • 39. Tiago MACHADO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:13
  • 40. Haimar ZUBELDIA AGIRRE, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 1:15
  • 41. Paul VOSS, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:20
  • 42. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:22
  • 43. Bob JUNGELS, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 1:25
  • 44. Leopold KONIG, TEAM SKY, at 1:25
  • 45. Armindo FONSECA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 1:25
  • 46. Paul MARTENS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:25
  • 47. Alberto LOSADA ALGUACIL, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:25
  • 48. Roman KREUZIGER, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 1:25
  • 49. Michal KWIATKOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:25
  • 50. Dominik NERZ, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:25
  • 51. Jacques JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 1:29
  • 52. Thibaut PINOT, FDJ, at 1:33
  • 53. Gorka IZAGUIRRE INSAUSTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:33
  • 54. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:39
  • 55. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:39
  • 56. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 1:52
  • 57. Emanuel BUCHMANN, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:59
  • 58. Wilco KELDERMAN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:59
  • 59. Mikael CHEREL, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:59
  • 60. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:59
  • 61. Bartosz HUZARSKI, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:59
  • 62. Romain SICARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 1:59
  • 63. Mathias FRANK, IAM CYCLING, at 1:59
  • 64. Sylvain CHAVANEL, IAM CYCLING, at 1:59
  • 65. Jérémy ROY, FDJ, at 2:08
  • 66. Edvald BOASSON HAGEN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 2:08
  • 67. Steve MORABITO, FDJ, at 2:08
  • 68. Anthony DELAPLACE, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 2:08
  • 69. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 2:17
  • 70. Jarlinson PANTANO, IAM CYCLING, at 2:29
  • 71. Kristijan KOREN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 2:29
  • 72. Florian VACHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 2:29
  • 73. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:29
  • 74. Simon GESCHKE, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:53
  • 75. Pierrick FEDRIGO, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 3:03
  • 76. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:24
  • 77. Jan BARTA, BORA-ARGON 18, at 3:58
  • 78. Stef CLEMENT, IAM CYCLING, at 3:58
  • 79. Richie PORTE, TEAM SKY, at 3:58
  • 80. Koen DE KORT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:58
  • 81. Stephen CUMMINGS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 82. Serge PAUWELS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 83. Ivan BASSO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 3:58
  • 84. Michael ROGERS, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 3:58
  • 85. Perrig QUEMENEUR, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 3:58
  • 86. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:58
  • 87. Christophe RIBLON, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:58
  • 88. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:58
  • 89. Ben GASTAUER, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:58
  • 90. Daniel TEKLEHAIMANOT, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 91. Reto HOLLENSTEIN, IAM CYCLING, at 3:58
  • 92. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 4:14
  • 93. Thomas VOECKLER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 4:14
  • 94. Jose Rodolfo SERPA PEREZ, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 4:16
  • 95. Jerome COPPEL, IAM CYCLING, at 4:16
  • 96. Brice FEILLU, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 4:16
  • 97. Angelo TULIK, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 4:24
  • 98. Julien VERMOTE, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 4:33
  • 99. Reinardt JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 4:33
  • 100. Nathan HAAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 4:36
  • 101. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 5:17
  • 102. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 103. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 6:13
  • 104. Kristijan DURASEK, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 105. Pieter WEENING, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:13
  • 106. Matteo BONO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 107. Nelson Filipe SANTOS SIMOES OLIVEIRA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 108. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 6:13
  • 109. Michal GOLAS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 6:13
  • 110. Michael ALBASINI, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:25
  • 111. Rafael VALLS FERRI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:35
  • 112. Michael SCHÄR, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 113. Danilo WYSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 114. Damiano CARUSO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 115. Grégory RAST, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 6:49
  • 116. Winner ANACONA GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 7:17
  • 117. Laurent DIDIER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 7:17
  • 118. Arnaud GERARD, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 8:01
  • 119. Peter KENNAUGH, TEAM SKY, at 8:11
  • 120. Andriy GRIVKO, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 8:14
  • 121. Rein TAARAMAE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 8:26
  • 122. Rohan DENNIS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 9:40
  • 123. Jonathan CASTROVIEJO NICOLAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:15
  • 124. Luca PAOLINI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 10:38
  • 125. Luke DURBRIDGE, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 10:45
  • 126. Dylan VAN BAARLE, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 10:45
  • 127. Thomas DE GENDT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:45
  • 128. Matthieu LADAGNOUS, FDJ, at 10:45
  • 129. Roy CURVERS, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:45
  • 130. Lieuwe WESTRA, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:45
  • 131. Frédéric BRUN, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 10:45
  • 132. Wouter POELS, TEAM SKY, at 10:45
  • 133. Alexandre GENIEZ, FDJ, at 10:45
  • 134. Lars BOOM, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:48
  • 135. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 136. Ramon SINKELDAM, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:54
  • 137. Marcel SIEBERG, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 138. Nicolas EDET, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 10:54
  • 139. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:54
  • 140. Bryan COQUARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:54
  • 141. Matthias BRANDLE, IAM CYCLING, at 10:54
  • 142. Bryan NAULLEAU, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:54
  • 143. Geoffrey SOUPE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 10:54
  • 144. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 145. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 10:54
  • 146. André GREIPEL, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 147. Sébastien CHAVANEL, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 148. Sep VANMARCKE, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 10:54
  • 149. Martin ELMIGER, IAM CYCLING, at 10:54
  • 150. Arnaud DEMARE, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 151. Stijn DEVOLDER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 10:54
  • 152. Dmitriy GRUZDEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:54
  • 153. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 10:54
  • 154. Adriano MALORI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:54
  • 155. Imanol ERVITI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:54
  • 156. Damien GAUDIN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 11:02
  • 157. Florian SENECHAL, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:02
  • 158. Yohann GENE, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 11:02
  • 159. Pierre-Luc PERICHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 11:02
  • 160. Jack BAUER, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 11:02
  • 161. Jens DEBUSSCHERE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 11:02
  • 162. José Joao PIMENTA COSTA MENDES, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:02
  • 163. Tyler FARRAR, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 11:02
  • 164. Daniele BENNATI, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 165. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 166. Michael VALGREN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 167. Christophe LAPORTE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 168. Mark RENSHAW, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 11:09
  • 169. Zakkari DEMPSTER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:09
  • 170. Mark CAVENDISH, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 11:09
  • 171. Jacopo GUARNIERI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:09
  • 172. Nacer BOUHANNI, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 173. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 11:09
  • 174. Alex DOWSETT, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 11:09
  • 175. Andreas SCHILLINGER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:09
  • 176. Kenneth VAN BILSEN, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 177. Ian STANNARD, TEAM SKY, at 11:09
  • 178. Thomas LEEZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 11:09
  • 179. Sebastian LANGEVELD, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 11:09
  • 180. Svein TUFT, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:09
  • 181. Johan VAN SUMMEREN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 11:24
  • 182. Luke ROWE, TEAM SKY, at 11:26
  • 183. Daryl IMPEY, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:28
  • 184. John DEGENKOLB, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 11:28
  • 185. Filippo POZZATO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 11:36
  • 186. Davide CIMOLAI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 11:36
  • 187. Markel IRIZAR ARANBURU, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 11:43
  • 188. Fabian CANCELLARA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 11:43
  • 189. Sam BENNETT, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:45
  • 190. Alexander KRISTOFF, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:47
  • 191. Marco HALLER, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:47
  • 192. Laurens TEN DAM, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 13:38
  • 193. Greg HENDERSON, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 14:13
  • 194. Michael MATTHEWS, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 21:38
  • DNF William BONNET, FDJ
  • DNF Dmitrii KOZONCHUK, TEAM KATUSHA
  • DNF Simon GERRANS, ORICA GreenEDGE
  • DNF Tom DUMOULIN, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN

 

General classification
  • 1. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, in 7:11:37
  • 2. Tony MARTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :01
  • 3. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, at :13
  • 4. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :26
  • 5. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, at :28
  • 6. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :31
  • 7. Rigoberto URAN URAN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :34
  • 8. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :36
  • 9. Geraint THOMAS, TEAM SKY, at 1:03
  • 10. Zdenek STYBAR, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:04
  • 11. Warren BARGUIL, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:07
  • 12. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 1:32
  • 13. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:38
  • 14. Robert GESINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:39
  • 15. Roman KREUZIGER, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 1:51
  • 16. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:51
  • 17. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:56
  • 18. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, at 2:00
  • 19. Michal KWIATKOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 2:02
  • 20. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 2:06
  • 21. Jean-Christophe PERAUD, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:07
  • 22. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:26
  • 23. Andrew TALANSKY, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 2:39
  • 24. Julien SIMON, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 2:45
  • 25. Leopold KONIG, TEAM SKY, at 2:52
  • 26. Romain BARDET, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:54
  • 27. Thibaut PINOT, FDJ, at 2:58
  • 28. Samuel SANCHEZ GONZALEZ, BMC RACING TEAM, at 2:58
  • 29. Gorka IZAGUIRRE INSAUSTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:10
  • 30. Rui Alberto FARIA DA COSTA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 3:10
  • 31. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:22
  • 32. Jan BAKELANTS, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:24
  • 33. Paul VOSS, BORA-ARGON 18, at 3:29
  • 34. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 3:34
  • 35. Jérémy ROY, FDJ, at 3:39
  • 36. Jacques JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:40
  • 37. Dominik NERZ, BORA-ARGON 18, at 3:40
  • 38. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 3:49
  • 39. Steve MORABITO, FDJ, at 3:52
  • 40. Mathias FRANK, IAM CYCLING, at 3:55
  • 41. Michael ROGERS, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 4:09
  • 42. Kristijan KOREN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 4:28
  • 43. Florian VACHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 4:35
  • 44. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 5:17
  • 45. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 5:17
  • 46. Richie PORTE, TEAM SKY, at 5:48
  • 47. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 6:01
  • 48. Serge PAUWELS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 6:03
  • 49. Ryder HESJEDAL, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 6:15
  • 50. Jan BARTA, BORA-ARGON 18, at 6:17
  • 51. Louis MEINTJES, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 6:17
  • 52. Bob JUNGELS, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 6:23
  • 53. Julian David ARREDONDO MORENO, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 6:29
  • 54. Cyril GAUTIER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 6:32
  • 55. Daniel NAVARRO GARCIA, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 6:36
  • 56. Haimar ZUBELDIA AGIRRE, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 6:36
  • 57. Adam YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:38
  • 58. Paul MARTENS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 6:40
  • 59. Tiago MACHADO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 6:41
  • 60. Pierre ROLLAND, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 6:42
  • 61. Eduardo SEPULVEDA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 6:45
  • 62. Wilco KELDERMAN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 6:49
  • 63. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 6:56
  • 64. Sylvain CHAVANEL, IAM CYCLING, at 7:04
  • 65. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 7:04
  • 66. Alberto LOSADA ALGUACIL, TEAM KATUSHA, at 7:08
  • 67. Edvald BOASSON HAGEN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 7:27
  • 68. Luis Angel MATE MARDONES, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 7:28
  • 69. Emanuel BUCHMANN, BORA-ARGON 18, at 7:31
  • 70. Romain SICARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 7:32
  • 71. Bartosz HUZARSKI, BORA-ARGON 18, at 7:35
  • 72. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 7:35
  • 73. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 7:49
  • 74. Giampaolo CARUSO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 7:49
  • 75. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 7:51
  • 76. Anthony DELAPLACE, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 8:01
  • 77. Michael SCHÄR, BMC RACING TEAM, at 8:04
  • 78. Armindo FONSECA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 8:10
  • 79. Nelson Filipe SANTOS SIMOES OLIVEIRA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 8:13
  • 80. Simon GESCHKE, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 8:18
  • 81. Jarlinson PANTANO, IAM CYCLING, at 8:20
  • 82. Michal GOLAS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 8:21
  • 83. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 8:30
  • 84. Stephen CUMMINGS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 8:50
  • 85. Pierrick FEDRIGO, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 8:54
  • 86. Damiano CARUSO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 9:07
  • 87. Matteo BONO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 9:10
  • 88. Reto HOLLENSTEIN, IAM CYCLING, at 9:27
  • 89. Jerome COPPEL, IAM CYCLING, at 9:27
  • 90. Stef CLEMENT, IAM CYCLING, at 9:35
  • 91. Christophe RIBLON, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 9:48
  • 92. Daniel TEKLEHAIMANOT, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 9:52
  • 93. Koen DE KORT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 9:55
  • 94. Rein TAARAMAE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 9:55
  • 95. Mikael CHEREL, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 9:55
  • 96. Andriy GRIVKO, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 9:55
  • 97. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 9:57
  • 98. Ivan BASSO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 10:03
  • 99. Julien VERMOTE, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 10:06
  • 100. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:08
  • 101. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 10:21
  • 102. Rohan DENNIS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 10:24
  • 103. Reinardt JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 10:30
  • 104. Ben GASTAUER, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 10:32
  • 105. Nathan HAAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 10:33
  • 106. Angelo TULIK, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:41
  • 107. Perrig QUEMENEUR, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:42
  • 108. Jose Rodolfo SERPA PEREZ, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 10:45
  • 109. Fabian CANCELLARA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 11:01
  • 110. Arnaud GERARD, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 11:03
  • 111. André GREIPEL, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 11:11
  • 112. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 11:18
  • 113. Marcel SIEBERG, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 11:24
  • 114. Pieter WEENING, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:40
  • 115. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 11:40
  • 116. Michael ALBASINI, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:45
  • 117. Ian STANNARD, TEAM SKY, at 11:47
  • 118. Mark CAVENDISH, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 11:51
  • 119. Danilo WYSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 11:58
  • 120. Matthias BRANDLE, IAM CYCLING, at 12:01
  • 121. Adriano MALORI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 12:07
  • 122. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 12:13
  • 123. Mark RENSHAW, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 12:15
  • 124. Rafael VALLS FERRI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 12:25
  • 125. Sep VANMARCKE, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 12:27
  • 126. Kristijan DURASEK, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 12:28
  • 127. Alex DOWSETT, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 12:29
  • 128. Grégory RAST, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 12:40
  • 129. Imanol ERVITI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 12:49
  • 130. Winner ANACONA GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 12:50
  • 131. Arnaud DEMARE, FDJ, at 12:50
  • 132. Matthieu LADAGNOUS, FDJ, at 12:53
  • 133. Jack BAUER, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 12:57
  • 134. John DEGENKOLB, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 12:57
  • 135. Ramon SINKELDAM, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 13:03
  • 136. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 13:04
  • 137. Zakkari DEMPSTER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 13:07
  • 138. Tyler FARRAR, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 13:08
  • 139. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 13:17
  • 140. Andreas SCHILLINGER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 13:18
  • 141. Christophe LAPORTE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 13:18
  • 142. Geoffrey SOUPE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 13:21
  • 143. Peter KENNAUGH, TEAM SKY, at 13:39
  • 144. Alexander KRISTOFF, TEAM KATUSHA, at 13:39
  • 145. Roy CURVERS, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 13:41
  • 146. Jacopo GUARNIERI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 13:44
  • 147. Filippo POZZATO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 14:02
  • 148. Sam BENNETT, BORA-ARGON 18, at 14:17
  • 149. Jonathan CASTROVIEJO NICOLAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 14:58
  • 150. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 15:29
  • 151. Sébastien CHAVANEL, FDJ, at 15:31
  • 152. Dylan VAN BAARLE, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 15:43
  • 153. Damien GAUDIN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 15:47
  • 154. Lieuwe WESTRA, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 15:50
  • 155. Luke DURBRIDGE, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 15:51
  • 156. Lars BOOM, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 15:52
  • 157. Thomas VOECKLER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 16:00
  • 158. Martin ELMIGER, IAM CYCLING, at 16:04
  • 159. Wouter POELS, TEAM SKY, at 16:10
  • 160. Daniele BENNATI, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 16:10
  • 161. Svein TUFT, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 16:14
  • 162. Greg HENDERSON, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 16:19
  • 163. José Joao PIMENTA COSTA MENDES, BORA-ARGON 18, at 16:30
  • 164. Thomas DE GENDT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 16:31
  • 165. Alexandre GENIEZ, FDJ, at 16:32
  • 166. Thomas LEEZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 16:36
  • 167. Dmitriy GRUZDEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 16:41
  • 168. Daryl IMPEY, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 16:45
  • 169. Florian SENECHAL, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 16:46
  • 170. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 16:46
  • 171. Sebastian LANGEVELD, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 16:48
  • 172. Bryan NAULLEAU, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 16:49
  • 173. Luca PAOLINI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 16:53
  • 174. Jens DEBUSSCHERE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 16:55
  • 175. Luke ROWE, TEAM SKY, at 17:05
  • 176. Bryan COQUARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 17:05
  • 177. Frédéric BRUN, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 17:06
  • 178. Brice FEILLU, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 17:06
  • 179. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 17:09
  • 180. Yohann GENE, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 17:15
  • 181. Kenneth VAN BILSEN, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 17:17
  • 182. Michael VALGREN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 17:18
  • 183. Johan VAN SUMMEREN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 17:32
  • 184. Davide CIMOLAI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 17:39
  • 185. Marco HALLER, TEAM KATUSHA, at 17:42
  • 186. Nacer BOUHANNI, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 17:43
  • 187. Pierre-Luc PERICHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 17:45
  • 188. Laurens TEN DAM, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 19:13
  • 189. Laurent DIDIER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 19:26
  • 190. Stijn DEVOLDER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 22:35
  • 191. Nicolas EDET, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 22:40
  • 192. Markel IRIZAR ARANBURU, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 23:03
  • 193. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 23:03
  • 194. Michael MATTHEWS, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 26:56

 

Best young rider
  • 1. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, in 7:12:08
  • 2. Warren BARGUIL, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :36
  • 3. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:25
  • 4. Michal KWIATKOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:31
  • 5. Romain BARDET, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 2:23
  • 6. Thibaut PINOT, FDJ, at 2:27
  • 7. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:51
  • 8. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 4:46
  • 9. Louis MEINTJES, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 5:46
  • 10. Bob JUNGELS, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 5:52
  • 11. Adam YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:07
  • 12. Eduardo SEPULVEDA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 6:14
  • 13. Wilco KELDERMAN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 6:18
  • 14. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 6:25
  • 15. Emanuel BUCHMANN, BORA-ARGON 18, at 7:00
  • 16. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 7:59
  • 17. Rohan DENNIS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 9:53
  • 18. Angelo TULIK, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:10
  • 19. Arnaud DEMARE, FDJ, at 12:19
  • 20. Christophe LAPORTE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 12:47
  • 21. Sam BENNETT, BORA-ARGON 18, at 13:46
  • 22. Dylan VAN BAARLE, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 15:12
  • 23. Luke DURBRIDGE, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 15:20
  • 24. Florian SENECHAL, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 16:15
  • 25. Luke ROWE, TEAM SKY, at 16:34
  • 26. Bryan COQUARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 16:34
  • 27. Kenneth VAN BILSEN, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 16:46
  • 28. Michael VALGREN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 16:47
  • 29. Marco HALLER, TEAM KATUSHA, at 17:11
  • 30. Nacer BOUHANNI, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 17:12
  • 31. Michael MATTHEWS, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 26:25

 

Stage 3 points
  • 1. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, 30 points
  • 2. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, 25 points
  • 3. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 22 points
  • 4. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, 19 points
  • 5. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, 17 points
  • 6. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, 15 points
  • 7. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 13 points
  • 8. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, 11 points
  • 9. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, 9 points
  • 10. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, 7 points
  • 11. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 6 points
  • 12. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, 5 points
  • 13. Julian David ARREDONDO MORENO, TREK FACTORY RACING, 4 points
  • 14. Robert GESINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 3 points
  • 15. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, 2 points

 

Points classification
  • 1. André GREIPEL, LOTTO SOUDAL, 75 points
  • 2. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, 48 points
  • 3. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, 40 points
  • 4. Mark CAVENDISH, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 37 points
  • 5. Fabian CANCELLARA, TREK FACTORY RACING, 35 points
  • 6. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, 30 points
  • 7. John DEGENKOLB, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 28 points
  • 8. Tony MARTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 25 points
  • 9. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, 22 points
  • 10. Nacer BOUHANNI, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, 22 points
  • 11. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, 21 points
  • 12. Rohan DENNIS, BMC RACING TEAM, 20 points
  • 13. Jan BARTA, BORA-ARGON 18, 20 points
  • 14. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, 19 points
  • 15. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, 19 points
  • 16. Bryan COQUARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, 19 points
  • 17. Stef CLEMENT, IAM CYCLING, 17 points
  • 18. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, 16 points
  • 19. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, 16 points
  • 20. Armindo FONSECA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, 15 points
  • 21. Warren BARGUIL, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 13 points
  • 22. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, 13 points
  • 23. Perrig QUEMENEUR, TEAM EUROPCAR, 13 points
  • 24. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, 11 points
  • 25. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 11 points
  • 26. Geoffrey SOUPE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, 10 points
  • 27. Alexander KRISTOFF, TEAM KATUSHA, 10 points
  • 28. Jonathan CASTROVIEJO NICOLAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, 10 points
  • 29. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, 9 points
  • 30. Geraint THOMAS, TEAM SKY, 9 points
  • 31. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, 9 points
  • 32. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, 9 points
  • 33. Matthias BRANDLE, IAM CYCLING, 9 points
  • 34. Robert GESINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 8 points
  • 35. Adriano MALORI, MOVISTAR TEAM, 8 points
  • 36. Roy CURVERS, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 8 points
  • 37. Roman KREUZIGER, TINKOFF – SAXO, 7 points
  • 38. Wilco KELDERMAN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, 7 points
  • 39. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, 6 points
  • 40. Stephen CUMMINGS, MTN – QHUBEKA, 6 points
  • 41. Kristijan KOREN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, 5 points
  • 42. Julian David ARREDONDO MORENO, TREK FACTORY RACING, 4 points
  • 43. Koen DE KORT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, 4 points
  • 44. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, 4 points
  • 45. Rigoberto URAN URAN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 3 points
  • 46. Alex DOWSETT, MOVISTAR TEAM, 3 points
  • 47. Kenneth VAN BILSEN, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, 3 points
  • 48. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, 2 points
  • 49. Daniele BENNATI, TINKOFF – SAXO, 2 points
  • 50. Bob JUNGELS, TREK FACTORY RACING, 1 point
  • 51. Michael SCHÄR, BMC RACING TEAM, 1 point
  • 52. Jack BAUER, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, 1 point

 

Mountains classification
  • 1. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, 2 points
  • 2. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF – SAXO, 1 point
  • 3. Michael SCHÄR, BMC RACING TEAM, 1 point
  • 4. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, 1 point

 

Teams classification
  • 1. Bmc Racing Team, in 21:35:52
  • 2. Etixx – Quick Step, at :27
  • 3. Team Sky, at 1:43
  • 4. Tinkoff – Saxo, at 1:44
  • 5. Movistar Team, at 4:34
  • 6. Team Giant – Alpecin, at 5:03
  • 7. Team Cannondale – Garmin, at 5:40
  • 8. Ag2r La Mondiale, at 5:44
  • 9. Trek Factory Racing, at 6:25
  • 10. Astana Pro Team, at 6:35
  • 11. Mtn – Qhubeka, at 6:53
  • 12. Team Katusha, at 7:08
  • 13. Lotto Soudal, at 7:44
  • 14. Cofidis, Solutions Credits, at 7:47
  • 15. Fdj, at 9:28
  • 16. Bora-argon 18, at 9:29
  • 17. Team Lotto Nl – Jumbo, at 9:51
  • 18. Iam Cycling, at 13:00
  • 19. Bretagne-seche Environnement, at 13:31
  • 20. Lampre – Merida, at 16:52
  • 21. Orica Greenedge, at 18:04
  • 22. Team Europcar, at 19:22

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MPCC temporarily suspends Astana

July 6, 2015 - 3:34pm

Lars Boom (Astana) started the Tour de France despite having low levels of cortisol, in violation of MPCC rules. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

On Monday, the Movement for Credible Cycling (MPCC) announced that it has temporarily suspended the Astana team for allowing Lars Boom to start the Tour de France.

Boom was found to have low levels of cortisol in a pre-Tour medical check. Although his test result did not contravene UCI regulations, it was at odds with the MPCC’s code. As the MPCC is a voluntary organization with non-binding rules, Astana chose to start Boom on Saturday in Utrecht, despite being a member team of the MPCC.

In the written statement, MPCC said, “In virtue of this decision, team Astana will no longer be subject to the unscheduled cortisol levels controls conducted by MPCC from this day on.

“We shall remind that cortisol levels controls are part of the health protection of the rider, because a collapse cortisol level can have serious consequences for the high-level athlete. Since 2009, more than 1,400 cortisol levels controls have been conducted on the riders belonging to teams’ members of MPCC.”

Prior to the 2015 Giro d’Italia, LottoNL-Jumbo removed George Bennett from its roster to comply with MPCC rules. He too had low cortisol levels in a pre-race test. The team later elected to leave the voluntary organization.

Astana’s spokesperson did not immediately respond to comment on the matter when contacted by VeloNews.

The post MPCC temporarily suspends Astana appeared first on VeloNews.com.

With pave on tap and yellow jersey in reach, cobbles riders face team dilemma

July 6, 2015 - 3:03pm

The 2014 Tour de France's cobblestone stage was a dramatic day of racing. Photo: BrakeThrough Media | brakethroughmedia.com

In the days before the Tour de France started, 2013 winner Chris Froome (Sky) predicted that the first week of this Tour de France would play out like “nine one-day classics” before the race for GC hits the mountains.

Froome’s assessment has proven correct thus far, with Sunday’s windy stage to Zélande, reminiscent of the coastal battles of Gent-Wevelgem, and Monday’s crash-marred stage, finishing with an uphill sprint on the Mur du Huy, the climb made famous at Flèche-Wallonne.

And the next serving at this “classics buffet” will be perhaps the most substantial — Tuesday’s stage 4 will cross over seven sectors of cobblestone roads, or pavé, utilized in the Queen of the Classics, Paris-Roubaix. Six of these sectors come within a 30km span of the stage finish, with the last sector coming 13km from the line.

Froome, who took ownership of the maillot jaune on Monday atop the Mur, is one of several major GC leaders whose team roster also contains a cobblestone classics specialist — and one who happens to also be well-positioned to take the race lead at the finish in Cambrai on Tuesday afternoon.

Virtual GC of cobblestone specialists whose teams have GC contenders

1. Greg Van Avermaet, BMC Racing
2. Peter Sagan, Tinkoff-Saxo, at 0:03
3. Geraint Thomas, Team Sky, at 0:35
4. Zdenek Stybar, Etixx-Quick-Step, at 0:36

Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo), fourth on the cobbles at the Tour last year and sixth at Paris-Roubaix a few months earlier, currently sits sixth on GC, 31 seconds behind Froome. His team leader, Alberto Contador, lost a bit of time on the Mur du Huy, and currently sits eighth overall, 36 seconds down — or five seconds behind Sagan.

Even higher on the classification is Greg Van Avermaet (BMC Racing), who finished third at Paris-Roubaix in April, and fourth in 2013. Van Avermaet sits fifth overall, 28 seconds behind Froome. He also sits 15 seconds behind his teammate, American Tejay van Garderen, who would surely benefit from his guidance across the pavé.

While others in the race, such as current Roubaix champion John Degenkolb (Giant-Alpecin) and runner-up, Zdenek Stybar (Etixx-Quick-Step), will have free rein to contest for the stage win, it’s likely that Sagan, Van Avermaet, and Thomas will be forced to ride in the service of their GC leaders. (Three-time Roubaix champion Fabian Cancellara of Trek Factory Racing was forced to abandon the Tour with fractured vertebrae.)

Stybar sits in a most unusual position, in that his Etixx teammate, Rigoberto Urán, while twice second overall at the Giro d’Italia, has never contended for victory at the Tour de France and has not been viewed as a podium threat.

Also complicating matters at Etixx is German TT specialist Tony Martin, who has sat second overall behind three different riders for three consecutive days. While Martin has no Roubaix pedigree, the three-time world time trial champion finished 17th on the Tour’s pavé last year, 2:02 down on stage winner Lars Boom. He, too, could well ride into the maillot jaune Tuesday, assuming he can stay within reach of the front of the race.

“I didn’t expect to even be this close,” Martin said Monday. “I am looking forward to tomorrow. The whole team is motivated for the cobbles and we will again fight for yellow.”

In Sky’s case, it’s a bit more straightforward — the team would not “gain” the maillot jaune if Thomas were to go up the road, as Froome is already holding the race lead. And in order for Thomas to take the yellow jersey, he’d need to take over 30 seconds from Van Avermaet and Sagan. However, given that Froome will also have classics stars Ian Stannard and Luke Rowe pulling him across the stones, Thomas may be given a bit of freedom.

“It’s a great position to be in going into the cobbles stage tomorrow,” Froome said. “Hopefully, being in yellow will motivate the whole team to stay together tomorrow and stay safe over the pavé.”

When each scenario is taken into consideration, it’s an interesting glimpse into the gambles and sacrifices, teams must make when prioritizing the general classification above all else.

Last year, when the Tour visited the cobbles on stage 5, it was Vincenzo Nibali, already wearing the yellow jersey, who emerged as the best-placed GC contender across the cobblestones, aided by super-domestique Jakob Fuglsang. The winner that day, Boom, now rides in Astana colors. This time around, no Astana riders are in in contention to take the maillot jaune, with Nibali the team’s best-placed rider, 13th overall, 1:38 behind Froome.

A better example of a cobblestone star riding with dual purpose across the pavé at the Tour came in 2010, when Cancellara shepherded Andy Schleck across the cobbles. Along with Cadel Evans, Schleck was the only major GC favorite to finish in the six-man front group. Cancellara didn’t win the stage — that honor went to Thor Hushovd — but he was able to take the maillot jaune by finishing sixth on the stage, in the same time as Hushovd.

Thomas finished second that day, while Contador rode well, finishing 13th, 1:13 behind the front group, and, memorably, 55 seconds ahead of Lance Armstrong, who had punctured on the cobbles, the beginning of his unraveling at his final Tour de France.

What’s likely is that this time around, cobblestone stars like Sagan, Van Avermaet, and Thomas will only be given leash to run in the context of their team leaders, and their relative position to GC rivals — i.e., if Contador has distanced Froome late in the race, Sagan may be allowed to contest for the win in the closing kilometers.

Sagan, who has worn the green jersey for nearly 60 days in his career but has never worn yellow, was characteristically muted on the subject, saying only, “We have to ride for Alberto [Contador] tomorrow. It will be a very dangerous stage. We will see.”

Posed the question on Twitter, Tinkoff road captain Michael Rogers replied, “Difficult Q to answer right now. Decision most likely to be made during the stage tomorrow.”

Van Averamet struck a similar tone as Sagan, deferring to his team leader, though he did directly address his own ambitions, saying, “The cobbles suit me a little bit better, and it is also not totally flat, which is good for me. There is a little bit of uphill on the cobbles, so I am looking forward to tomorrow. The main goal is Tejay for sure, but I hope to go for a stage victory.”

And when it’s all said and done, perhaps the only thing that’s certain about the cobblestones is uncertainty — even for a cobblestone specialist, protecting a team leader is easier said than done. Crashes, punctures, and poor positioning can all see large time gaps open quickly. In 2010, on the same stage that Cancellara shepherded Andy Schleck to through to the front group, his older brother Frank was one of the pavé’s first casualties, breaking his collarbone and exiting the Tour. It’s a very real scenario, and one that could change the dynamic of the stage, and GC, in an instant.

The post With pave on tap and yellow jersey in reach, cobbles riders face team dilemma appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Pro Bike Gallery: Chris Froome’s Pinarello Dogma

July 6, 2015 - 2:28pm

Froome snagged the yellow jersey with just one second to spare from Tony Martin. Three stages and three riders in yellow; what will tomorrow hold? Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

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  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Chris Froome took the yellow jersey by a slim margin during a crash-marred stage 3 at the 2015 Tour de France aboard a Pinarello Dogma. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Froome snagged the yellow jersey with just one second to spare from Tony Martin (Etixx-Quick-Step). Three stages and three riders in yellow; what will tomorrow hold? Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    While the bike itself is fairly unassuming, there are plenty of eye-catching bits, including Pinarello's signature fork with curves and waves aimed at creating a stiff yet compliant front end. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Like many riders, Froome uses a Garmin head unit, but unlike many others, he's not using the new Edge 520. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    The flat back of the seatpost aids in aerodynamic flow and adds another distinguishing touch to the unassuming aesthetic. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Carbon everywhere. The headset spacer dons the Pinarello logo and more carbon weave for subdued beauty. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    If there's an edge to be had, riders and their mechanics will find it. Froome uses what appears to be a pared-down Di2 remote shifter, allowing him to shift easily from the bar flats. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    A 120mm PRO stem gives Froome the reach he needs for his lanky frame. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    An off-the-shelf Fizik Antares with carbon rails is Froome's saddle of choice for stage 3 from Antwerp to Huy. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Perhaps the most eye-catching component on Froome's bike is the Osymetric chainring that looks like a penny squashed on a railroad track. It supposedly compensates for dead spots in the pedal stroke for more efficient power output. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Look carefully and you'll see a raw chunk of carbon glued to the bottom bracket junction. This functions as a chain catcher, paired with the K-Edge guide, should Froome come close to dropping a chain during downshifts. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    While most riders ran 25mm tires or wider during stage 3, Froome's tires measure 22mm according to the sidewall. They were mounted to a Dura-Ace rim, and they likely measured closer to 23mm or 24mm. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    While the Osymetric ring supposedly ups the power ante, it can certainly wreak havoc on front shifting. The gap between the derailleur cage and big-ring teeth is quite substantial when the flatter parts of the chainring pass near. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Chris Froome's Pinarello Dogma

    Froome cools down after a stormy stage 2 in good position to take the yellow jersey. Stage 3 saw him take yellow aboard his Pinarello Dogma. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

The post Pro Bike Gallery: Chris Froome’s Pinarello Dogma appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Tour de France GC men rally troops for pave stage

July 6, 2015 - 2:09pm

Vincenzo Nibali's fearless, ferocious ride on the Tour de France's stage 5 cobblestones will be long remembered as a turning point in the race, if not his career. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

HUY, Belgium (VN) — It’s been called a mini Paris-Roubaix, but it’s not. Not really. The Tour’s fourth stage, across the pavé of Northern France, is more complicated.

Beyond the luck and legs required on any trip across the stones, the stage will be defined by the balance between team obligation and individual glory, as some classics stars seek to protect their climbers while others hunt for the stage win, and everyone, climbers and classics men alike, tries to be at the front at the same time.

The 223.5-kilometer route is only 30 km shorter than the April classic, and passes over seven sectors, 13.3km, of its renowned pavé, but the dynamic within the peloton is entirely different.

The peloton is split, quite distinctly, between those who want a stage win and those seeking to survive, or to help a team leader survive. Issues arise when both groups want to be in the same place — the front — at the same time.

“It’s hard to predict in a stage like that,” said Mick Rogers, one of Alberto Contador’s chief lieutenants at Tinkoff-Saxo. “Random things happen, they can be in the front, middle, or back. What can we do to mitigate that? We can ride together as nine guys. If you have two guys here, three over there, and four in the back, it’s hard to do anything to try to overcome a bad situation. If you’re all together, you have a better chance. Our only job is to protect Alberto.”

Classics stars without a major GC contender will be given free reign on Tuesday, permitted to be aggressive and make the race. The classics men on teams aiming for overall success, like Rogers, Sky’s Geraint Thomas and Ian Stannard, and BMC’s Daniel Oss, will be charged with ushering and protecting their respective GC leaders, shelving personal ambitions for team goals.

Slight climbers, who are often physically, tactically, and experientially unsuited to the rough pavé, will be towed into the head of the race. At Paris-Roubaix itself, such riders would never see the front, or even the start line, for that matter.

“It’s very different, it’s so nervous,” said John Degenkolb (Giant-Alpecin). “You need to be so early in front because the GC teams are riding there with eight guys, nine guys in front, they’re trying to protect their leader.”

“Many of the guys are not used to riding in the cobbles … you need to be prepared for everything,” he added.

The course itself may work in the GC men’s favor, Degenkolb said.

“Most of [the sectors] go uphill, that means it’s not typical for Paris-Roubaix, it’s more like maybe in Flanders,” he said. “It suits the GC contenders a little bit more. It’s going to be a big war, the only way to survive there and to hold the chance to win is to stay in front and don’t drop position.”

GC guardians

Many of the sport’s biggest classics stars will be relegated to protective duties for Tuesday’s stage.

Vincenzo Nibali (Astana) proved his mettle on the cobbles last year, taking time on all of his rivals. He crossed the line ahead of men like Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing), Peter Sagan (Tinkoff-Saxo), and Sep Vanmarcke (LottoNL-Jumbo). This year, Astana has added Boom, the winner of last year’s Tour cobble stage, to its arsenal.

Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) has faithful domestiques like Rogers at his side, as well as specialists Peter Sagan and Matteo Tosatto.

Froome has Thomas and Stannard, as well as Luke Rowe, eighth this year at Paris-Roubaix.

Tejay van Garderen (BMC) will be accompanied by Daniel Oss, who crashed Monday, as well as Manuel Quinziato, Michael Schar, and Greg van Avermaet.

Nairo Quintana (Movistar) is perhaps the most exposed of the top overall contenders. He’ll rely on time trialists Alex Dowsett and Adriano Malori.

Andrew Talansky (Cannondale-Garmin) will be well-protected with Sebastian Langeveld, Jack Bauer, and Kristijan Koren.

Rigoberto Uran (Etixx-Quick-Step) has the might of Etixx-Quick-Step behind him, but the team hasn’t shown full dedication to its GC leader thus far and a few of its strongest riders, like Zdenek Stybar, may be allowed to ride for themselves.

Romain Bardet (Ag2r La Mondiale) can rely on Paris-Roubaix winner Johan Vansummeren, provided he isn’t too injured from his Monday crash, while Thibaut Pinot (FDJ) has Arnaud Démare.

The post Tour de France GC men rally troops for pave stage appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Cancellara out of Tour de France with fractured vertebrae

July 6, 2015 - 2:00pm

Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) started the day in yellow, but finished the day in pain, due to a major crash on the way to the finish in Huy. He would withdraw from the Tour later in the day with two fractured vertebrae. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

LIÈGE, Belgium (VN) — Swiss hard-man Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) pulled the plug on the Tour de France after crashing while wearing the race leader’s yellow jersey Monday afternoon.

The high-speed incident occurred with around 20 others, 55 kilometers from Huy, Belgium, and caused two fractured vertebrae for Cancellara. He struggled to finish the stage, 11:43 behind winner Joaquím Rodríguez (Katusha), and lost the yellow jersey.

He and the team hoped he could continue, but after a high 24 hours before, his Tour ended on a low. In a press release later, Trek Factory Racing announced the bad news.

Cancellara suffered “Two transverse process fractures in two vertebrae bones of the lower back,” read the press release. It was the same injury that forced him out of the E3 Harelbeke in March and ended his spring classics campaign. “But this time the L3 and L4 vertebrae on the right side were the culprits, not the L2 and L3 on the left side he injured in Harelbeke.”

Cancellara wrote the news on Twitter and said it was “a huge disappointment.”

“This is incredibly disappointing for me,” Cancellara added in the press release.

“The team was on a high with the yellow jersey and were very motivated to defend it. We have had a lot of crashes and injuries since the start of the season, and we finally had a great 24 hours but now it’s back to bad luck. One day you win, one day you lose.

“It was very hard to come back in shape after my crash in Harelbeke and getting the confidence. The yellow jersey gave me a huge boost for the cobblestone stage tomorrow.”

Cancellara came into the Tour, aiming to return to the top after a disappointing spring campaign and help team leader Bauke Mollema. He fell just short behind Rohan Dennis (BMC Racing) in the time trial on day one in Utrecht, but bounced back well with a sprint for third in Zélande on Sunday. The bonus seconds on offer earned him the yellow jersey.

“The next hope was the cobbled stage to Cambrai,” general manager Luca Guercilena said at the Trek bus before taking Cancellara to the hospital.

“Right now it’s quite complicated that he could even continue; crashing at 80kph is nothing that can allow you to go [fast on the cobbles].”

Cancellara aimed to win the cobbled stage to Cambrai on Tuesday. The stage covers some of the same pavé sectors that he used to win three Paris-Roubaix titles.

The crash was a sour end for Cancellara who first held the yellow jersey in the Tour de France 11 years ago, in 2004, when it began in Liège. He donned the jersey again and won eight stages, but this yellow jersey was special for 34-year-old ‘Spartacus’ since the close of his career is around the corner.

“Now, to obtain results is harder than it was before,” Guercilena told VeloNews Monday morning.

“Now, he appreciates victories even more. To obtain results is harder than it was before for Fabian [Cancellara]. We truly enjoyed the moment yesterday. We were all happy.”

Cancellara said that the 2015 Tour de France could be his last. His contract with Trek runs through 2016, and Guercilena explained that he should ride until the end.

Even with the unexpected crash, Guercilena said, “Fabian still has some goals to reach before he retires.”

Cancellara looked ahead rather than dwelling too much on the disappointment of abandoning the race. “I guess I have to keep the positive,” he said, “look forward to the second part of the season.”

The post Cancellara out of Tour de France with fractured vertebrae appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Rodriguez believes classics don’t belong in Tour

July 6, 2015 - 1:22pm

Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) may have finished stage 3 on the top step of the podium after the Mur de Huy finale, but he insists that classics-style races do not belong in the Tour de France. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

HUY, Belgium (VN) — One might assume that Joaquím Rodríguez (Katusha) was happy when he saw Mur de Huy featured in this year’s Tour de France route. The Spanish pocket rocket won Flèche Wallonne atop the punchy climb in 2012, and with this year’s first week of the Tour route packed with classics-like courses, Rodríguez should have been licking his lips.

One would have assumed wrong. Rodríguez seemed more relieved than ecstatic Monday after taking a huge victory atop the Mur, fending off Chris Froome (Sky) to take his second-career Tour stage win.

“I am not a big fan that the Tour de France has the Mur de Huy on the route,” Rodríguez said emphatically. “Everyone knows that I love the classics, but there is a big difference between the classics and a grand tour. With the dangers like we saw yesterday, with the wind, and what we faced today, and tomorrow with the pavé, I think it’s a bit excessive. We already have Flèche Wallonne and Paris-Roubaix.”

Rodríguez’s comments came after a horrendous crash disrupted Monday’s stage with about 50km to go, when more than a dozen riders hit the deck in a high-speed pileup, including yellow jersey Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing). Cancellara broke two bones in his back and was forced to abandon the Tour after Monday’s stage.

Another rider who is built for hilly classics, Simon Gerrans (Orica-GreenEdge), was among four riders forced to abandon. So many race doctors were attending the injured and fallen riders that officials were forced to bring the peloton to a screeching halt to bring order back to the fractured race.

Monday’s drama came on the heels of Sunday’s opening road stage against gusting winds and rain that drove echelons along the Dutch coast. And if that was not enough, on Tuesday, the peloton faces more than 13km of cobblestones in seven sectors of a 220km stage.

For Rodríguez, it seems all a bit too much, especially when the second half of the Tour is packed with brutal mountain stages.

“These types of stages might bring a bit of a drama to the race, but it adds to the stress and the number of crashes that the riders must endure,” he continued. “In my opinion, the Tour should be won by the strongest rider, not the rider who has the best luck and least amount of problems.”

Rodríguez managed to steer clear of trouble and even snagged the best climber’s jersey, but that was in sharp contrast to Sunday, when the veteran Spaniard punctured and then crashed twice in the chaos, losing 1:28 to the top finishers.

“Yesterday was a bit of a disaster, but it could have been even worse,” he said, now 18th overall, 2:00 back. “I managed to limit my losses, but it’s a bit frustrating. I came into this Tour in top condition, and I am confident in my chances.”

Rodríguez is hoping to limit his losses in the first half to go into the mountains with his GC chances intact. In 2013, no one counted on Rodríguez, but he rebounded after suffering big losses in the time trials to finish third overall.

Katusha sport director José Azevedo told VeloNews on Monday morning that the team has riders to support Rodríguez despite adding firepower for Alexander Kristoff in the sprints.

“We believe in Joaquim’s [Rodríguez] chances. It’s important to limit the losses in the first half, and that’s part of the reason why we brought a few more bigger guys,” Azevedo said. “I think this Tour is similar to 2013. Joaquim is strong and experienced, and that will go for a long way in this Tour.”

Many have called this year’s route one of the most demanding in Tour history. The opening week is packed with classics-style courses, with a team time trial waiting in stage 9. All that comes before the first major climbing stage, with two hard summit finales in the Pyrénées, and four more in the French Alps.

Rodríguez just shakes his head when he contemplates about what’s looming in the mountains.

“This week, a lot will already happen, because you have luck one day, and then the next you do not. And then we have the Pyrénées and then the Alps,” he said. “The Alps this year are very, very, very hard. A lot will happen between here and Paris.”

That’s exactly what everyone is hoping for.

The post Rodriguez believes classics don’t belong in Tour appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Froome blasts Tour rivals again, moves into yellow

July 6, 2015 - 12:58pm

Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) tried to hold Chris Froome's wheel, but the Sky rider rode clear and earned the yellow jersey in stage 3 of the Tour de France. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

HUY, Belgium (VN) — It is only the early days, but Sky’s Chris Froome is in charge of the 2015 Tour de France. He conquered the flat, windswept coastal roads of the Netherlands on Sunday and the short and steep climb up the Mur de Huy in Belgium on Monday.

Froome now wears the coveted yellow jersey on the eve of the dangerous cobbled stage through Northern France. He leads the race by 13 seconds over Tejay van Garderen (BMC Racing), 36 on Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo), 1:38 on Vincenzo Nibali (Astana), and 1:56 on Nairo Quintana (Movistar).

The lead came thanks to an end-of-stage blast up the Mur or ‘wall’ above the Belgian town of Huy. Under the hot sun’s rays and with the fans cheering him on, Froome followed eventual stage-winner Joaquím Rodríguez (Katusha) and left behind the others.

Nibali, van Garderen, and Quintana trailed by 11 seconds. Contador struggled on what should have been his stomping ground and crossed the line at 18 seconds. Adding to that, Froome gained an extra six-second time bonus for placing second.

“I’m just really happy to be in the yellow at this point; it’s unexpected. I was hoping to be up there today, but I’m just happy to come second ahead of my GC rivals,” Froome said after putting on the yellow top.

“It’s a great position going into tomorrow’s stage. I’d much rather be in this position than try to make up time on my rivals.”

Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) lost a chance to defend his lead due to a crash 55 kilometers out, but Froome clearly and fairly won the classification battle once the race restarted.

Contador, who won the Giro d’Italia in May, suffered the worst out of the major contenders. The signs were there when he lost precious seconds in the opening time trial, but he appeared back in charge when he zipped away with Froome Sunday in Zélande. It could be nothing, or it could mean he is paying for the efforts in Italy two months ago.

“It was a bit of time to lose,” Contador explained from the doorstep of Tinkoff-Saxo’s yellow bus.

“I said this morning, before the start, that if you have a bad day or bad luck, you can lose more time in these stages than you can in a big mountain stage. Maybe I missed a little bit in the end. What’s sure is that Chris Froome is looking very strong.

The Astana team manager told VeloNews that, with the stages and heat, it is one of the most stressful first weeks of the Tour de France that he has seen in recent years. Nibali said that Froome managed the effort well today.

“I just tried to handle myself, riding alongside van Garderen with Contador behind,” Nibali said when he arrived to the team bus after an anti-doping control.

“My morale is high, but the time loss suffered yesterday didn’t help. There are still many days ahead in the Tour, anything can still happen.”

“Froome gained a bit, but I was able to ditch a couple of people and keep the important guys close,” van Garderen said.

“Tomorrow is going to be the last of the mini-monuments, we have had crosswinds, Ardennes classics, and now a cobbled race.”

Froome took time and the yellow jersey, but he also delivered a mental blow and positioned himself better for the cobbled stage ahead.

The Tour de France’s stage 4 covers some of the same cobbled roads that the Paris-Roubaix uses each year. When it reenters France in the north, it covers 13.3-kilometers of pavé split over seven sectors en route to Cambrai.

With Froome in the overall lead, Sky will have its car up front in the convoy behind the race. It could be crucial in saving seconds if Froome or his teammates need mechanical assistance.

“That is the most important,” Sky’s manager, David Brailsford said. “The one day when you want car number one is tomorrow.”

Froome delivered another blow to his rivals and took the yellow lead, but as Nibali said “anything can still happen” in this Tour de France. The race faces another 18 stages, which includes several high-mountain passes through the Pyrenees and Alps, before it pulls into Paris on July 26.

The post Froome blasts Tour rivals again, moves into yellow appeared first on VeloNews.com.

Gallery: 2015 Tour de France, stage 3

July 6, 2015 - 12:28pm

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  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Cancellara in yellow

    Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) started the day in yellow, but finished the day in pain, due to a major crash on the way to the finish in Huy. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Vansummeren and wife

    Johan Vansummeren (Ag2r La Mondiale), and his wife Jasmine, posed for photos before the start of stage 3. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Trentin has some fun

    Matteo Trentin (Etixx-Quick-Step) kept the mood playful, as he rolled to the start line. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Cancellara roll out

    Fabian Cancellara had a big smile on his face, as he rolled though fans on his way to the start in Antwerp. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Cancellara at the start

    At the start in Antwerp, Fabian Cancellara and Tom Dumoulin (Giant-Alpecin) were the center of attention. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Rodriguez roll-out

    Joaquim Rodriguez (Katusha) looked confident as he rolled to the start of stage 3. Rodriguez was very familiar with the finishing climb having won on it during La Flèche Wallonne in 2012. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Trek team car

    Some fun graphics were taped to the back of the Trek Factory Racing team car. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Antwerp to Huy

    Stage 3 was 159 kilometers from Antwerp to Huy, and had four categorized climbs, finishing on the Mur de Huy. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Five-time Tour winner

    Eddy Merckx felt at home in Belgium on stage 3 of the Tour de France. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Merckx roadside

    Merckx watched the Tour de France from the roadside, as it rolled and crashed its way through his home nation of Belgium. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Legends of cycling

    Eddy Merckx and Bernard Hinault had a chat before the start of stage 3. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Merckx territory

    Translation from Dutch to English, "Thanks Eddy". Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Four-man break

    Serge Pauwels (MTN-Qhubeka), Martin Elmiger (IAM Cycling), Jan Barta (Bora-Argon 18), and Bryan Nauleau (Europcar) broke away from the peloton early in the stage. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Race neutralized

    After a nasty crash with about 59 kilometers to go, race officials decided to neutralize the race, allowing all riders affected to return to the peloton before restarting the race. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Cancellara injured

    Fabian Cancellara went down hard during the pile-up, but returned to racing even though he was visibly in pain. For the rest of the stage, Cancellara struggled to stay with the main group. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Froome leads on the Mur de Huy

    With 500 meters to go, Chris Froome (Sky) led the group up the Mur de Huy with Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) on his wheel. Contador faded on the climb, finishing outside the top 10. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Van Garderen finish

    As Rodriguez prepared for the final effort, Tejay van Garderen (BMC) was sitting in good position and finished sixth on the stage. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Rodriguez attack

    Rodriguez launched his attack on the steepest pitches of the Mur de Huy, with Tony Gallopin (Lotto-Soudal) and Froome trying to hold his wheel. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Rodriguez checks on Froome

    Froome stayed close to Rodriguez, but could not match his surge for the line. Froome finished second on the stage, grabbing a valuable time bonus, which put him in the overall lead. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Rodriguez victory

    Joaquim Rodriguez won stage 3 of the Tour de France, atop the Mur de Huy. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

  • View Larger Image.2015 Tour de France, stage 3: Froome leads the Tour de France

    After stage 3, Chris Froome took the yellow jersey at the 2015 Tour de France. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

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Talansky ready to tackle Tour cobbles after 2014 mishap

July 6, 2015 - 12:00pm

Andrew Talansky survived a rough ride on the cobblestones in stage 5 at the 2014 Tour. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews.com

One year ago, Tour de France riders awoke to horrendous conditions in Northern France as they prepared for stage 5 and got ready to face the cobblestones used in the “Hell of the North,” Paris-Roubaix.

For American Andrew Talansky (Cannondale-Garmin), it marked the beginning of his struggles before he would eventually withdraw from the 2014 edition of the Tour prior to the start of stage 12. Looking back, Talansky remembers what he gained that day, not what he lost.

“That [ride] gave me a lot of confidence, being able to do the cobbles in the rain,” Talansky told VeloNews days before the start of the 2015 Tour in Utrecht, Netherlands. “I’m not afraid of the cobbles, I look at it more as an opportunity than something to just get through.”

Recon

As a lanky climber, Talansky is not built for the pounding the body takes while riding over the cobbles. He wanted to enter this year prepared to go the distance, so he enlisted the help of one of Cannondale’s classic specialists. He set out to preview the sections of cobblestones he would face in July in early spring.

“Jack Bauer was kind enough to go out with me the day after Paris-Roubaix,” Talansky said. Talansky himself had just finished the tough six-day Vuelta al Pais Vasco (Tour of the Basque Country) stage race in the western Pyrenees. “We were both hurting a little bit, but we took over the cobbles, we went over them with speed, tested the equipment, same as I did last year.”

Talansky views reconnaissance as vital not only to being physically prepared for what’s to come, but also mentally. “It allowed us to get [the equipment] all dialed in and be mentally prepared for that day,” Talansky said.

Redemption

On Tuesday, Talansky will join the peloton once again to tackle the cobblestones of northern France. The stage will be long and fatiguing, as the peloton faces 223.5 kilometers and seven sections of cobblestones totaling just over 13km. The cobblestones come toward the end of the stage.

For the slender climbers of the peloton it will be a day to stay out of trouble and survive, but the rider nicknamed ‘Pit bull’ sees the stage as a chance at redemption.

Last year, Talansky was having a decent ride on the cobbles during stage 5.

“I went off the road once on the cobbles, but I was actually, for my size and everything, of the best guys on the cobbles.”

All that changed when the peloton entered the Bersée section of cobbles.

“I had to avoid Jurgen van de Broeck doing a front flip. There’s not much you can do about that,” Talansky said.

As a result, Talansky veered off the road and crashed into some fans. Unharmed, he got up and continued, but the damage had already been done.

“I learned last year, the Tour is going to go how the Tour is going to go. You do all of the work, you do everything you can, and then the truth is, for you to get the result you are capable of you’re going to need a little bit of luck.”

Past years have shown the Tour de France is unpredictable. On any given day, anything can happen. Talansky has prepared well, but he is also at peace with the fact that anything can occur over the rough roads in the north of France.

“It’s not that you need everything to go perfectly, you just need to avoid anything going catastrophically wrong, like it did last year. That kind of gives me a little bit more peace of mind this year,” Talansky said.

After losing time on stage 1, Talansky will need a solid ride on the cobblestones to make sure his GC ambitions stay intact before the race reaches the mountains. The weather will be much more favorable this year, as partly sunny skies and temperatures in the low 80s are expected.

Once the dust settles in northern France, however, will Talansky know if he got the redemption he wanted on the cobblestones.

Caley Fretz contributed reporting to this story.

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Pro Bike Gallery: Fabian Cancellara’s yellow Trek Domane Team Issue

July 6, 2015 - 11:47am

Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) took the yellow jersey, and with it came a custom yellow Trek Domane Team Issue. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

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  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Fabian Cancellara took the yellow jersey and with it came a custom yellow Trek Domane Team Issue. Unfortunately for Cancellara, he would only ride it for one day, as his stint in yellow was cut short by a crash. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    A gold accent adorns Cancellara's stem. The superstitious Swiss rider was rumored to have seen the bike for the first time only when he left the team bus to check in before stage 3. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    The SRM PC8 head unit wears yellow, like its rider. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Another gold accent is affixed to the top tube of Cancellara's Domane as a quick reminder of whom the yellow jersey belongs to for stage 3. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Trek's IsoSpeed decoupler helps smooth some of the rough pavement and brief cobbles riders encounter in stage 3. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    A simple ribbon of gold on the front hub accents the fully yellow bike, another homage to the little things a rider needs to do to take the GC lead. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Cancellara would start stage 3 on the yellow Domane that sports a 53/39 gearing up front, but he would not finish the day on it as he went down in a crash. He continued the stage on his white Domane. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    In lieu of electronic shifting, Cancellara prefers Shimano's mechanical Dura-Ace group. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Elegant curves look almost regal on Spartacus' bike. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Shift cables are routed internally, from just behind the head tube down to the chain stays for improved aerodynamics and a sleek look. Photo: | Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    Bontrager's Aeolus 5 wheels feature deep rims for aerodynamics and stiffness when Cancellara is out of the saddle. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    What yellow bike would be complete without all the other complementary accents? Cancellara's Oakley glasses feature yellow frames to celebrate his GC pursuits. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Pro Bike: Fabian Cancellara's yellow Trek Domane

    A team representative whisks Cancellara's bike away so the GC leader can prepare for stage 3. Take a good look, because this is the last time you'll see the bike undamaged; a brutal stage 3 crash forced Cancellara to abandon the yellow Domane halfway through the stage. Photo: Caley Fretz | VeloNews

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Airgas-Safeway to make most of Qinghai Lake en route to Utah

July 6, 2015 - 11:33am

Luis Lemus will be Airgas-Safeway's go-to rider in the high mountains of the Tour of Qinghai Lake. Photo: Daebong Kim

Xining, CHINA — Airgas-Safeway may have been snubbed by the Amgen Tour of California, but the U.S.-registered UCI Continental cycling team is wasting little time moving on.

In just its second year of existence, Airgas-Safeway currently finds itself at the start of a grueling two-race stretch beginning with the pinnacle of the UCI Asia Tour as one of 22 teams competing in the 14th Tour of Qinghai Lake (2.HC) in China.

Known as the “highest” pro cycling race in the world with an elevation averaging more than 9,840 feet, the 13-day, 2,027-kilometer stage race has attracted teams from around the globe, including Italian WorldTour team Lampre-Merida, as well as Italian Pro Continental teams Nippo-Vini Fantini and Southeast Pro Cycling.

“As a coach and a director, this is a perfect stepping stone for us,” Airgas-Safeway sport director Bart Bowen told VeloNews prior to the start of the opening stage circuit in Xining. “I talked to the team last night and told them it’s going to be a whole new world you are going into, and after seven days of racing it’s going to get real.”

With a wide-open field, Qinghai Lake is anybody’s race, and Bowen believes, while his team is looking forward to racing the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah in August, his team is not overlooking its chances this month in Asia.

“We have three or four guys that are climbing really well,” said Bowen. “Obviously, Luis Lemus and Gerardo Medina come from altitude so this is a nice race for them.

“The rest,” he continued. “Like Griffin Easter, Connor McCutcheon, and Kevin Gottlieb are our engines, and 20-year-old Justin Mauch can climb, and he’s on form.

“Overall, we have a strong group that can excel in this kind of race.”

Bowen considered American Matt Rodrigues his “secret weapon” heading into Qinghai Lake, but the 31-year-old suffered a broken rib and scapula in a crash-marred stage 2.

Of the original seven-man roster, Bowen is most leaning toward Lemus when the race takes a turn for the sky.

“Luis is our most-experienced rider,” explained Bowen. “He’s done this race before, as well as the Tour of Utah, Tour of Colorado [USA Pro Challenge] and has the most racing days in his legs. In my mind he has the most ability already just doing those type of races and knows what to expect.”

The 23-year-old, two-time Mexican road race champion (2012, 2013), who finished eighth last week at nationals, raced Qinghai Lake three years ago while riding for Jelly Belly-Maxxis at the time and admits the race is not one to take lightly.

“I expect it to be at least as hard as the last time I did it in terms of altitude and distance,” said Lemus, who lives in Aguascalientes at more than 5,900 feet above sea level. “I regularly train at more than 2,200 meters [7,218 feet], but I will still feel the altitude when the race kicks up over 3,000 meters. If you are a rider that lives closer to sea level, you are in for a tough week.

“This is also the longest race I’ve ever done, but I told the team it’s just a bike race and to take it day by day,” he added. “We are expecting the whole team to finish as that’s our first main goal, because this is the group that will race Utah, which is a shorter race — but not easier.”

Lemus’ 21-year-old compatriot is looking forward to the opportunity.

“I’m happy to be here, and I think we can get some results and motivation for Utah,” said Medina, who was recently named to his second national under-23 world championships team. “I think this race is where we can take the most out of our director Bart Bowen, as well as Luis [Lemus] and his experience because if we use too much energy in the first week, we will pay for it in the second week.”

Following Qinghai Lake, the team will join 43-year-old veteran cyclist and 2013 Vuelta a España winner Chris Horner in Utah and 23-year-old Gottlieb could not be happier.

“I still get goosebumps riding with Horner,” Gottlieb admits. “Utah is a huge goal of ours because it’s an American race, and we’ve been trying to get into California and Colorado and we finally got our foot into one, so Qinghai Lake is perfect race prep for Utah.

“But this race comes first,” he continued. “Altitude concerns me because I’m bigger and I’m pretty nervous about it — especially the climbs.

“The good thing is that a few of my teammates have spent some time at altitude and they will be all right.

Aaron S. Lee is a cycling and triathlon columnist for Eurosport and a guest contributor to VeloNews.

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Results: 2015 Tour de France, stage 3

July 6, 2015 - 11:16am

  • 1. Joaquin RODRIGUEZ OLIVER, TEAM KATUSHA, in 3:26:54
  • 2. Christopher FROOME, TEAM SKY, at :00
  • 3. Alexis VUILLERMOZ, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :04
  • 4. Daniel MARTIN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :05
  • 5. Tony GALLOPIN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at :08
  • 6. Tejay VAN GARDEREN, BMC RACING TEAM, at :11
  • 7. Vincenzo NIBALI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at :11
  • 8. Simon YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at :11
  • 9. Nairo Alexander QUINTANA ROJAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :11
  • 10. Bauke MOLLEMA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at :11
  • 11. Alejandro VALVERDE BELMONTE, MOVISTAR TEAM, at :11
  • 12. Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :18
  • 13. Julian David ARREDONDO MORENO, TREK FACTORY RACING, at :19
  • 14. Robert GESINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at :22
  • 15. Greg VAN AVERMAET, BMC RACING TEAM, at :22
  • 16. Jean-Christophe PERAUD, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :24
  • 17. Warren BARGUIL, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at :24
  • 18. Julien SIMON, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at :28
  • 19. Rigoberto URAN URAN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :34
  • 20. Pierre ROLLAND, TEAM EUROPCAR, at :36
  • 21. Romain BARDET, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at :36
  • 22. Louis MEINTJES, MTN – QHUBEKA, at :36
  • 23. Cyril GAUTIER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at :36
  • 24. Ryder HESJEDAL, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :40
  • 25. Andrew TALANSKY, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at :40
  • 26. Tony MARTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :40
  • 27. Peter SAGAN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at :40
  • 28. Eduardo SEPULVEDA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at :45
  • 29. Daniel NAVARRO GARCIA, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at :45
  • 30. Merhawi KUDUS GHEBREMEDHIN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at :45
  • 31. Zdenek STYBAR, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at :52
  • 32. Adam YATES, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 1:00
  • 33. Giampaolo CARUSO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:05
  • 34. Jan BAKELANTS, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:08
  • 35. Samuel SANCHEZ GONZALEZ, BMC RACING TEAM, at 1:10
  • 36. Geraint THOMAS, TEAM SKY, at 1:10
  • 37. Luis Angel MATE MARDONES, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 1:10
  • 38. Rui Alberto FARIA DA COSTA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 1:13
  • 39. Tiago MACHADO, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:13
  • 40. Haimar ZUBELDIA AGIRRE, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 1:15
  • 41. Paul VOSS, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:20
  • 42. Michele SCARPONI, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:22
  • 43. Bob JUNGELS, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 1:25
  • 44. Leopold KONIG, TEAM SKY, at 1:25
  • 45. Armindo FONSECA, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 1:25
  • 46. Paul MARTENS, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:25
  • 47. Alberto LOSADA ALGUACIL, TEAM KATUSHA, at 1:25
  • 48. Roman KREUZIGER, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 1:25
  • 49. Michal KWIATKOWSKI, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 1:25
  • 50. Dominik NERZ, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:25
  • 51. Jacques JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 1:29
  • 52. Thibaut PINOT, FDJ, at 1:33
  • 53. Gorka IZAGUIRRE INSAUSTI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 1:33
  • 54. Georg PREIDLER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 1:39
  • 55. Jakob FUGLSANG, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 1:39
  • 56. Rafal MAJKA, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 1:52
  • 57. Emanuel BUCHMANN, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:59
  • 58. Wilco KELDERMAN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:59
  • 59. Mikael CHEREL, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 1:59
  • 60. Steven KRUIJSWIJK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 1:59
  • 61. Bartosz HUZARSKI, BORA-ARGON 18, at 1:59
  • 62. Romain SICARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 1:59
  • 63. Mathias FRANK, IAM CYCLING, at 1:59
  • 64. Sylvain CHAVANEL, IAM CYCLING, at 1:59
  • 65. Jérémy ROY, FDJ, at 2:08
  • 66. Edvald BOASSON HAGEN, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 2:08
  • 67. Steve MORABITO, FDJ, at 2:08
  • 68. Anthony DELAPLACE, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 2:08
  • 69. Marcel WYSS, IAM CYCLING, at 2:17
  • 70. Jarlinson PANTANO, IAM CYCLING, at 2:29
  • 71. Kristijan KOREN, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 2:29
  • 72. Florian VACHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 2:29
  • 73. Tanel KANGERT, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 2:29
  • 74. Simon GESCHKE, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 2:53
  • 75. Pierrick FEDRIGO, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 3:03
  • 76. Tim WELLENS, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:24
  • 77. Jan BARTA, BORA-ARGON 18, at 3:58
  • 78. Stef CLEMENT, IAM CYCLING, at 3:58
  • 79. Richie PORTE, TEAM SKY, at 3:58
  • 80. Koen DE KORT, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 3:58
  • 81. Stephen CUMMINGS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 82. Serge PAUWELS, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 83. Ivan BASSO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 3:58
  • 84. Michael ROGERS, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 3:58
  • 85. Perrig QUEMENEUR, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 3:58
  • 86. José HERRADA LOPEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 3:58
  • 87. Christophe RIBLON, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:58
  • 88. Lars Ytting BAK, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 3:58
  • 89. Ben GASTAUER, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 3:58
  • 90. Daniel TEKLEHAIMANOT, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 3:58
  • 91. Reto HOLLENSTEIN, IAM CYCLING, at 3:58
  • 92. Bram TANKINK, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 4:14
  • 93. Thomas VOECKLER, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 4:14
  • 94. Jose Rodolfo SERPA PEREZ, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 4:16
  • 95. Jerome COPPEL, IAM CYCLING, at 4:16
  • 96. Brice FEILLU, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 4:16
  • 97. Angelo TULIK, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 4:24
  • 98. Julien VERMOTE, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 4:33
  • 99. Reinardt JANSE VAN RENSBURG, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 4:33
  • 100. Nathan HAAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 4:36
  • 101. Daniel OSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 5:17
  • 102. Ruben PLAZA MOLINA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 103. Nicolas ROCHE, TEAM SKY, at 6:13
  • 104. Kristijan DURASEK, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 105. Pieter WEENING, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:13
  • 106. Matteo BONO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 107. Nelson Filipe SANTOS SIMOES OLIVEIRA, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:13
  • 108. Ramunas NAVARDAUSKAS, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 6:13
  • 109. Michal GOLAS, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 6:13
  • 110. Michael ALBASINI, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 6:25
  • 111. Rafael VALLS FERRI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 6:35
  • 112. Michael SCHÄR, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 113. Danilo WYSS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 114. Damiano CARUSO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 6:49
  • 115. Grégory RAST, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 6:49
  • 116. Winner ANACONA GOMEZ, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 7:17
  • 117. Laurent DIDIER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 7:17
  • 118. Arnaud GERARD, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 8:01
  • 119. Peter KENNAUGH, TEAM SKY, at 8:11
  • 120. Andriy GRIVKO, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 8:14
  • 121. Rein TAARAMAE, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 8:26
  • 122. Rohan DENNIS, BMC RACING TEAM, at 9:40
  • 123. Jonathan CASTROVIEJO NICOLAS, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:15
  • 124. Luca PAOLINI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 10:38
  • 125. Luke DURBRIDGE, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 10:45
  • 126. Dylan VAN BAARLE, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 10:45
  • 127. Thomas DE GENDT, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:45
  • 128. Matthieu LADAGNOUS, FDJ, at 10:45
  • 129. Roy CURVERS, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:45
  • 130. Lieuwe WESTRA, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:45
  • 131. Frédéric BRUN, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 10:45
  • 132. Wouter POELS, TEAM SKY, at 10:45
  • 133. Alexandre GENIEZ, FDJ, at 10:45
  • 134. Lars BOOM, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:48
  • 135. Benoît VAUGRENARD, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 136. Ramon SINKELDAM, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:54
  • 137. Marcel SIEBERG, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 138. Nicolas EDET, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 10:54
  • 139. Albert TIMMER, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 10:54
  • 140. Bryan COQUARD, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:54
  • 141. Matthias BRANDLE, IAM CYCLING, at 10:54
  • 142. Bryan NAULLEAU, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 10:54
  • 143. Geoffrey SOUPE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 10:54
  • 144. Adam HANSEN, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 145. Jos VAN EMDEN, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 10:54
  • 146. André GREIPEL, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 10:54
  • 147. Sébastien CHAVANEL, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 148. Sep VANMARCKE, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 10:54
  • 149. Martin ELMIGER, IAM CYCLING, at 10:54
  • 150. Arnaud DEMARE, FDJ, at 10:54
  • 151. Stijn DEVOLDER, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 10:54
  • 152. Dmitriy GRUZDEV, ASTANA PRO TEAM, at 10:54
  • 153. Matteo TRENTIN, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 10:54
  • 154. Adriano MALORI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:54
  • 155. Imanol ERVITI, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 10:54
  • 156. Damien GAUDIN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 11:02
  • 157. Florian SENECHAL, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:02
  • 158. Yohann GENE, TEAM EUROPCAR, at 11:02
  • 159. Pierre-Luc PERICHON, BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONNEMENT, at 11:02
  • 160. Jack BAUER, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 11:02
  • 161. Jens DEBUSSCHERE, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 11:02
  • 162. José Joao PIMENTA COSTA MENDES, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:02
  • 163. Tyler FARRAR, MTN – QHUBEKA, at 11:02
  • 164. Daniele BENNATI, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 165. Matteo TOSATTO, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 166. Michael VALGREN, TINKOFF – SAXO, at 11:09
  • 167. Christophe LAPORTE, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 168. Mark RENSHAW, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 11:09
  • 169. Zakkari DEMPSTER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:09
  • 170. Mark CAVENDISH, ETIXX – QUICK STEP, at 11:09
  • 171. Jacopo GUARNIERI, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:09
  • 172. Nacer BOUHANNI, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 173. Manuel QUINZIATO, BMC RACING TEAM, at 11:09
  • 174. Alex DOWSETT, MOVISTAR TEAM, at 11:09
  • 175. Andreas SCHILLINGER, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:09
  • 176. Kenneth VAN BILSEN, COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS, at 11:09
  • 177. Ian STANNARD, TEAM SKY, at 11:09
  • 178. Thomas LEEZER, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 11:09
  • 179. Sebastian LANGEVELD, TEAM CANNONDALE – GARMIN, at 11:09
  • 180. Svein TUFT, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:09
  • 181. Johan VAN SUMMEREN, AG2R LA MONDIALE, at 11:24
  • 182. Luke ROWE, TEAM SKY, at 11:26
  • 183. Daryl IMPEY, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 11:28
  • 184. John DEGENKOLB, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN, at 11:28
  • 185. Filippo POZZATO, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 11:36
  • 186. Davide CIMOLAI, LAMPRE – MERIDA, at 11:36
  • 187. Markel IRIZAR ARANBURU, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 11:43
  • 188. Fabian CANCELLARA, TREK FACTORY RACING, at 11:43
  • 189. Sam BENNETT, BORA-ARGON 18, at 11:45
  • 190. Alexander KRISTOFF, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:47
  • 191. Marco HALLER, TEAM KATUSHA, at 11:47
  • 192. Laurens TEN DAM, TEAM LOTTO NL – JUMBO, at 13:38
  • 193. Greg HENDERSON, LOTTO SOUDAL, at 14:13
  • 194. Michael MATTHEWS, ORICA GreenEDGE, at 21:38
  • DNF William BONNET, FDJ
  • DNF Dmitrii KOZONCHUK, TEAM KATUSHA
  • DNF Simon GERRANS, ORICA GreenEDGE
  • DNF Tom DUMOULIN, TEAM GIANT – ALPECIN

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Brand wins Giro Rosa stage 3; Guarnier retains GC lead

July 6, 2015 - 11:08am

Lucinda Brand (Rabo-Live) won stage 3 of the Giro Rosa and also extended her lead in the points classification. Photo Credit: Flaviano Ossola

Dutch national champion Lucinda Brand (Rabo-Liv) sprinted to victory from a select group in stage 3 of the Giro Rosa. American Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans) retained the maglia rosa with the general classification remaining virtually unchanged.

The longest stage of this year’s Giro Rosa at 130km from Curtatine to Mantova was animated from the beginning as Lindsey Williams (Orica-AIS) made a solo move in the opening kilometers. She was caught shortly before the lone queen of the mountains bonus of the day, and this allowed Flavia Oliveira (Ale Cipollini) to capture the QOM points.

Shortly after the QOM, the winning breakaway was established. The move included Brand, Mayuko Hagiwara (Wiggle-Honda), Valentina Scandolara (Orica-AIS), Malgorzata Jasinska (Alè-Cipollini), Chiara Pierobon (Top Girls-Fassa Bortolo), Claudia Lichtenberg (Liv-Plantur), Elena Cecchini (Lotto-Soudal), Daiva Tuslaite (Inpa Sottoli Giusfredi), and Loren Rowney (Velocio-SRAM). Elena Franchi (Servetto-Footon) attempted to bridge up to the leaders with around 60km remaining in the stage, but was unsuccessful.

The peloton accelerated as the race approached the finish, trying to catch the nine leaders for a bunch sprint. Ultimately they got the timing wrong, as Brand out-sprinted Scandolara and Italian national champion Cecchini for the victory. The peloton finished over one minute behind the leaders with Guarnier finishing safely in the bunch to retain her overall lead. With the victory, Brand extended her lead in the points classification.

Last year’s winner Marianne Vos (Rabo-Liv) is not racing but was on hand to watch this year’s race finish for the first time in Italy.

Top 10, stage 3: Curtatone – Mantova (136 km)

1. Lucinda Brand (Rabo-Liv) 3h17’57”
2. Valentina Scandolara (Orica-AIS) +0”
3. Elena Cecchini (Lotto-Soudal) +0”
4. Loren Rowney (Velocio-SRAM) +0”
5. Mayuko Hagiwara (Wiggle-Honda) +0”
6. Daiva Tuslaite (Inpa Sottoli Giusfredi) +0”
7. Malgorzata Jasinska (Alè Cipollini) +0”
8. Claudia Lichtenberg (Liv-Plantur) +0′
9. Chiara Pierobon (Top Girls Fassa Bortolo) +10”
10. Annalisa Cucinotta (Alè Cipollini) +1’15”

General classification top 10 after stage 3:

1. Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans Cycling Team) 9h’07’01”
2. Anna Van der Breggen (Rabo-Liv) +2”
3. Ashleigh Moolman (Bigla) +5”
4. Lucinda Brand (Rabo-Liv) +12”
5. Elisa Longo Borghini (Wiggle-Honda) +13”
6. Evelyn Stevens (Boels Dolmans) +15”
7. Katarzyna Niewadoma (Rabo-Liv) +17”
8. Karol-Ann Canuel (Velocio-SRAM) +24”
9. Mara Abbott (Wiggle-Honda) +37”
10. Elena Cecchini (Lotto-Soudal) +43”

The jerseys of the 26th Giro Rosa after stage 3:

Maglia Rosa: Megan Guarnier (Boels Dolmans)
Maglia Ciclamino: Lucinda Brand (Rabo-Liv)
Maglia Verde: Carlee Taylor (Lotto-Soudal)
Maglia Bianca: Katarzyna Niewadoma (Rabo-Liv)
Maglia Blu: Elisa Longo Borghini (Wiggle-Honda)

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Pro Bike Gallery: Andre Greipel’s Ridley Noah SL

July 6, 2015 - 8:54am

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  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah SL was the German's choice for the hilly stage 3 of the 2015 Tour de France. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    The lime-green paint job certainly makes Greipel and his team stand out as they hope to build on Greipel's successful stage 2 win. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    Low-positioned seat stays help aid in aerodynamics and frame compliance. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    The seat stays are lower because the seat tube is shaped aerodynamically. While this is good for air flow, it's not so good for rider comfort, so the lower stays help counteract some of that stiffness. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    A course profile is taped to Greipel's stem so he knows what's coming up ahead of him on course. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    It's a low-tech solution, but a simple and effective one. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    Vive le Tour! Greipel's PC8 head unit offers some encouragement before he heads out for stage 3. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    The red arm reaching downward from the derailleur is a chain guide used to ensure Greipel doesn't get chain suck during downshifts. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    A Deda cockpit leads the way. Greipel runs Campagnolo Super Record EPS drivetrain components and shifters for quick, smooth shifts. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    Some flashy graphics set off Greipel's San Marco saddle. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    The front view of the San Marco Concor saddle reveals a slight rise at the nose. Photo: Dan Cavallari | VeloNews

  • View Larger Image.Andre Greipel's Ridley Noah

    For stage 3's mix of hills and flats, Greipel runs a 53/39 gearing up front. Photo: Dan Cavallari | Velonews

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Losing Tour de France yellow ‘hard pill to swallow’ for Dennis

July 6, 2015 - 8:33am

Rohan Dennis lost the yellow jersey in Sunday's stage 2 at the Tour. Photo: Tim De Waele | TDWsport.com

ZEELAND, Netherlands (AFP) — Rohan Dennis (BMC Racing) said it was a “hard pill to swallow” making the decision to give up the yellow jersey after just one day at the Tour de France.

The 25-year-old Australian scorched to a brilliant victory on Saturday’s opening stage time trial to wear yellow on Sunday’s second stage from Utrecht to Zeeland in the Netherlands.

But he was caught behind when the peloton split up due to crashes and as he was alongside reigning champion Vincenzo Nibali (Astana) at that time, he put his BMC team leader Tejay van Garderen’s interests before his own and waved goodbye to the jersey.

Van Garderen is hoping to challenge the “fantastic four” of Nibali, Chris Froome (Sky), Alberto Contador (Tinkoff-Saxo) and Nairo Quintana (Movistar) for overall victory and currently sits ahead of all of them in the standings.

“I didn’t expect to have to make the call out on the road that I did that they don’t wait for me and that they go ahead when there was a small split, but that’s racing,” said a downbeat Dennis.

“In the end, that was the best decision to make for Tejay’s long-term goal for finishing in Paris.

“There was a split, [Thibaut] Pinot pulled off, he let the wheel go and before I could know what was going on he pulled right and so did everyone else,” Dennis said.

“They looked to me to close the gap but I knew straight away that Tejay was in front and I started looking around to see who was in the bunch. Nibali was there and he was ready to go.

“It was one of those decisions that was a hard pill to swallow when I did but I decided to not chase and to give up, well potentially give up the yellow jersey to put Nibali in a spot of difficulty and hopefully lose time.

“That was my plan, it went that way but it took a while for me to be 100 percent happy with that decision.”

Dennis said his teammates felt bad for leaving him like that but he told them “not to wait” because it was “the best thing for the team.”

“A lot of guys came to me and they said sorry and I said don’t be sorry,” he added.

However, he still enjoyed his day in yellow and said it has whet his appetite for more.

“It was a good experience, it was an honor to wear it [the yellow jersey] and I hope it happens again, maybe next year,” Dennis said.

“I don’t know what the course is but it’s always a goal of mine to be able to wear a leader’s jersey, especially in the biggest race of the year.

“Everyone said to me it must be a dream come true and it really is.

“When I was a kid I only knew of the Tour de France, I didn’t know of any race other than this and it was always ‘I want to win that race,’ or at least lead it for a short period.”

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Massive crash provokes momentary stop in Tour stage

July 6, 2015 - 8:29am

The Tour de France organizers neutralized the race midway through stage 3 due to a major crash.

HUY, Belgium (VN) — The Tour de France came to a grinding halt Monday after a massive pileup prompted race officials to momentarily stop the third stage, something rarely seen in the heat of the race.

Yellow jersey Fabian Cancellara (Trek Factory Racing) was catapulted into the roadside grass, and seemed to be experiencing back pain, and eventually ceded the maillot jaune after finishing nearly 12 minutes in arrears. The Swiss time trial and classics ace suffered a fractured vertebrae earlier this season at E3 Harelbeke.

Citing a lack of medical personnel to attend the shattered peloton, race officials stopped the peloton a few kilometers after nearly two dozen riders toppled head-over-heels in a high-speed crash. GPS tracking data revealed the peloton was zipping along at 42kph.

On a flat, wide-open stretch of road about 59km to go, an FDJ rider clipped wheels near the front end of the peloton, causing a massive crash that was impossible to avoid for riders powering along the right side of the road. More than a dozen hit the tarmac, many with serious injuries. Tom Dumoulin (Giant-Alpecin), Simon Gerrans (Orica-GreenEdge), Dmitry Kozontchuk (Katusha), and William Bonnet (FDJ) all abandoned.

Others hit the ground hard, including Daniel Oss (BMC Racing), Daniel Teklehaimanot (MTN-Qhubeka), Johan Van Summeren (Ag2r-La Mondiale), and Greg Henderson (Lotto-Soudal). Laurens Ten Dam (Lotto-JumboNL) suffered a dislocated shoulder, but still managed to finish the stage.

As riders, staff and medical personnel assessed the damage, Tour director Christian Prudhomme stood out of the roof window of the lead car, and waved the riders to slow down a few kilometers down the road. Moments later, the decision was made to stop the race entirely, something rarely seen in a top-level race.

“I’ve never seen that before in a race, but for them to stop the Tour like that, we feared it was something very serious. Now that we hear that it was for a question over medical staff, everyone is relieved,” said Tinkoff-Saxo’s Alberto Contador at the finish line. “I was not involved in the crash, but it just shows how dangerous the Tour can be at any moment.”

Battered and bloodied riders slowly rejoined the peloton, many with grimacing faces and torn jerseys. After nearly 10 minutes in a village along the route, the race resumed, but the day’s first climb, the category 4 Cote de Bohissau was also neutralized. The race recommenced at the top of the climb.

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